Index Pr 7007 Pr 7012 Pr 7014 Pr 7025 Pr 7034 Pr 7044 Pr 7054
Pr 7076 Pr 7094 Pr 7109 Pr 7129 Pr 7150 Pr 7166 Pr 7200 Deb 120

cover

PRESTIGE LP 7007
Hi Fi
PRESTIGE LP 7007
Hi Fi
The MUSINGS OF MILES
Miles Davis, trumpet * Red Garland, piano
Oscar Pettiford, bass * Philly Joe Jones, drums

play

I DIDN'T * WILL YOU STILL BE MINE? * GREEN HAZE
I SEE YOUR FACE BEFORE ME * A NIGHT IN TUNISIA
A GAL IN CALICO


At the age of 15, Miles Davis was becoming fairly proficient on the trumpet. He was listening avidly to Freddy Webster and had heard Bird on some of Jay McShann's records. Many of the bands that came to St. Louis (Miles was living with his family across the river in East St. Louis, Illinois) heard Miles and offered him jobs. There were bands like McKinney's Cotton Pickers, Earl Hines, Tiny Bradshaw and Illinois Jacquet. His mother didn't like the idea of him leaving town and after turning down a job with Jacquet for this reason, Miles wouldn't talk to her for two weeks. About four months later, Billy Eckstine's band came to town and Miles met Bird and Dizzy Gillespie. Through Dizzy he was able to sit in with the band for the two weeks that they were in town.

In 1945 Miles came to New York to study at Juilliard. He met Bird who remembered him and took him around to 52nd Street where he was introduced to Coleman Hawkins and Thelonious Monk. His first record date with Bird upset him completely. He was so nervous that he couldn't play on Ko Ko and Dizzy had to do the trumpet part as well as back Bird on piano.

These experiences were related to me by Miles in a recent conversation. As we talked the time switched from past to present. I asked Miles who his current favorites were. On his own instrument he quickly named Art Farmer and Clifford Brown as the new stars and Kenny Dorham as one who has come into his own. Then he spoke lovingly of Dizzy Gillespie. "Diz


is it . . . whenever I want to learn something I go and listen to Diz." In the piano department two Philadelphia boys, Red Garland (heard to good advantage in this LP) and Ray Bryant were mentioned along with Horace Silver, Hank Jones and Carl Perkins "a cat on the Coast who plays bass notes with his elbow". The talk shifted to saxophone and to Sonny Rollins and Hank Mobley who are carrying on the tradition of Charlie Parker. This naturally started us talking about Bird. Miles credited his most wonderful experiences in jazz to his years with Bird. He stared slowly ahead "Like Max (Roach) said, "New York isn't New York anymore without Bird." Max's name being mentioned directed the conversation to drummers. "Art Blakey and Philly Joe Jones; Max for brushes." Miles is very conscious of drummers. Many times he will sit down between the drummer and bass player and just listen to what the drummer is doing. You might even say that listening to drummers is a hobby with Miles. His real hobby, however, is boxing and he concerns himself with two aspects - spectator and participator. As a spectator he is not merely a TV fan. You'll find him at Madison Square Garden or St. Nick's when he is in New York and similar arenas in other cities when there is a good match on tap. His personal fistic activity is confined to working out on the light punching bag in various gyms. Anything more would be dangerous. One stiff right cross to the "chops" and this LP might have been delayed indefinitely.

notes by IRA GITLER
engineering by Van Gelder
cover photo; supervision by Bob Weinstock


Cover

DIG MILES DAVIS
with Sonny Rollins
LP 7012 12"

Cover

MILES DAVIS AND HORNS
Al Cohn, Sonny Rollins
LP 7025 12"

Cover

MILES DAVIS QUINTET/
SEXTET w Milt Jackson
LP 7034 12"

Cover

BLUE HAZE
Miles Davis Quartet
LP 7054 12"

Cover

MILES DAVIS
Collector's Items
LP 7044 12"


Users of wide-range equipment should adjust their controls to the RIAA curve for best results.