1946

Charlie Parker Chronology

 

 

 

 

 

Created by Leif Bo Petersen

Last updated September 6, 2021.

 

Date

Event

 

References/Further Details

 

January

Metronome 1945 Poll

Small band:

11. Dizzy Gillespie.

 

Hot alto:

1. Benny Carter

2. Charlie Parker

3. Johnny Hodges

 

“Herd. Flip. Diz. Harris. Slam. Tough New Winners,” Metronome, January 1946, 17, 34–35- 65.

 

January

Esquire All American Jazz band 1946

New star awards:

Pete Candoli (tp); J. J. Johnson (tb); Ray Perry (v); Jimmy Hamilton (cl); Charlie Parker (as); Charlie Ventura (ts); Erroll Garner (p); Bill DeArango (g); Junior Raglin (b); J. C. Heard (d); Billy Eckstine, Frances Wayne (voc); ralph Burns (arr); Woody Herman (band).

 

“Esquire’s Jazz Show Scheduled,” Birmingham News, January 8, 1946, 11.

Esquire's All-American Jazz Band, 1946,” Esquire, February 1946, 56–59.

 

January 1

Down Beat 1945 Band Poll

Alto sax:

1. Johnny Hodges

2. Willie Smith

3. Toots Mondello

4. Johnny Bothwell

5. Charlie Parker

 

“Woody & TD Win, Ten New All-Stars,” Down Beat, January 1, 1946, 1, 5, 16.

January 1

Dizzy Gillespie and his Orchestra

Dizzy Gillespie (tp); Charlie Parker (as); Lucky Thompson (ts); Milt Jackson (vib); Al Haig (p); Ray Brown (b); Stan Levey (d).

Billy Berg's Supper Club, Vine Street, Hollywood, CA.

Closing February 3.

 

R. Russell, Bird Lives (1988), 205: has closing Monday, February 4.

"Dizzy Gillespie Set for Billy Berg's 1st Hollywood Job," Billboard, November 24, 1946, 34:  opening December 10 for at least 8 weeks.

“Los Angeles Band Briefs,” Down Beat, January 28, 1946, 6: “Dizzy Gillespie  was too much for the Hollywood ‘Hep-cats’ who frequented Billy Berg’s. The spot has been generally crowded during Dizzy’s stay but too many were professionals.”

“Dizzy’s Combo Comes Back to New York,” Down Beat, January 28, 1946, 1:  Closes at Berg’s February 3. “…following his return here, will build another large band.”

“With the Lamplighter,” Los Angeles Daily News, February 8, 1946, 33: “Milton DeLugg opened Monday [February 4] at Billy Berg’s…”.

 

January 24

Dizzy Gillespie and his Orchestra

Dizzy Gillespie (tp); Charlie Parker (as); Lucky Thompson (ts); Milt Jackson (vib); Al Haig (p); Ray Brown (b); Stan Levey (d).

NBC studio, Hollywood, CA.

7:30 p.m. (PST): NBC broadcast: "Villa Vallée" (Rudy Vallée Show).

Recording exists.

 

“Your Radio Today,” Los Angeles Times, January 24, 1946: KFI: 7:30 p.m.: Vallée Show.

“Tonight's Aces:” Wisconsin State Journal, January 24, 1946, 21: WIBA (NBC): 9:30 p.m.: Rudy Vallée. Guests: Jean Hersholt actor and Dizzy  Gillespie, trumpeter).

C. Woideck, Charlie Parker: His Music and Life (1996), 32, 248 note 120: Gibson tells about a visit of Parker and himself to Vallée’s home.

http://www.plosin.com/milesahead/BirdSessions.aspx?s=460124

 

January 28

Concert

Gene Krupa Trio

Charlie Ventura (ts); Ted Napoleon (p); Gene Krupa (d).

Helen Humes

Willie Smith

Mel Powell

Dizzy Gillespie

Charlie Parker

Howard McGhee

Arnold Ross

Lester Young

Al Killian (tp); Billy Hadnott (b); Lee Young (d).

Philharmonic Auditorium, Los Angeles, CA.

8:15 p.m.

Down Beat Magazine Award Winners Concert

Norman Granz and Down Beat (prod).

Nat King Cole and The Pied Pipers received their Down Beat Awards during the concert.

Concert recordings exist.

 

Ad in Los Angeles Times, January 27,  1946, Part III, 2: The ad has Anita O’Day, which apparently was replaced by Helen Humes at the concert.

“Norman Granz to offer another ‘Jam Session.’” Los Angeles Tribune, January 19, 1946, 18.

“Names Take Jazz Concert,” Pittsburgh Courier, February 9, 1946, 18: Review: Describes the 3 sets of the concert:

1. Lester Young, Howard McGhee, Charlie Parker, Al Killian, Willie Smith, and rhythm.

2. Gene Krupa Trio; Nat King Cole; Pied Pipers.

3. Helen Humes, Charlie Ventura, Willie Smith, Dizzy Gillespie, Lester Young, and rhythm.

http://www.plosin.com/milesahead/BirdSessions.aspx?s=460128a

http://www.plosin.com/milesahead/BirdSessions.aspx?s=460128b

 

 

February

Clyde Hart

Release of Continental C-6013

10” 78 rpm. record.

 

Recorded January 4, 1945

Clyde Hart's All-Stars

Continental C-6013-A

What's the Matter Now

Continental C-6013-B

That's the Blues

 

“Advance Record Releases,” Billboard, January 19, 1946, 80.

“Record Reviews,” Metronome, March 1946, 27: Rating: What’s the Matter Now: B (good); That’s the Blues: B+ (very good).

February 4

Jam Session

Dizzy Gillespie (tp); Charlie Parker (as); probably Lucky Thompson (ts); unidentified (p), Red Callender? (b), Harold "Doc" West? (d).

Freddie James' house, Los Angeles, CA.

Probably early morning after the closing night, February 3.

Lacquer (acetate) dubs of private recordings exist.

 

K. Vail, Bird's Diary (1996), 17: Gives  date as the closing date at Billy Berg’s: February 4 (no source given).

http://www.plosin.com/milesahead/BirdSessions.aspx?s=460204

http://www.plosin.com/milesahead/BirdSessions.aspx?s=450530

D. Gillespie and A. Fraser, To Be or Not... to Bop (1979), 507: The discography here considers both above-mentioned tracks as being from February 1946, CA, and belonging to the Freddie James collection.

The existing original sources for this material are two lacquer-sides (acetates) from the Bob Redcross collection, which now are in the Norman Saks collection. K. Vail (ed.), Charlie Parker & Jazz Club Memorabilia (2007), 20, has photos of the labels of these. The printed label information tells that these records were made by Modern Recording Studio, Chicago, IL. The labels have typed information stating the titles, Lover Come Back to Me and Sweet Georgia Brown, and telling that they are dubs made from home recordings. There are several handwritten notes on the labels, some of which have been revised or scratched out, for instance the name Freddie James on the Sweet Georgia Brown label.

The conventional dating of the latter track (Sweet Georgia Brown) is Lincoln Square Garden, New York, NY, May 30, 1945. However, both tracks may belong to a New York 1945 jam session (look May 30, 1945, for my discussion of this date).

 

February 4

Dizzy Gillespie Jazzmen

Dizzy Gillespie (tp); Charlie Parker (as); Lucky Thompson (ts); George Handy (p); Arvin Garrison (g); Ray Brown (b); Stan Levey (d).

Electro Broadcasting Studios, Glendale, CA.

Rehearsal for commercial recording date for Dial Records.

Ross Russell (prod).

George Handy supervised the rehearsal. Lester Young was supposed to participate but did not turn up.

One test track was recorded.

 

Ross Russell in R. Reisner, Bird: The Legend of Charlie Parker (1962), 196-97: Russell tells in detail about the rehearsal, which took place a few days before the final recording date.

R. Russell, Bird Lives (1988), 205: The rehearsal was on the night after the closing at Berg’s.

CD: Gillespie/Berman/Navarro on Dial. Spotlite SPJ (CD) 132: The liner notes here have February 5.

http://www.plosin.com/milesahead/BirdSessions.aspx?s=460205

 

February 5

Dizzy Gillespie Jazzmen

Dizzy Gillespie (tp, voc); Lucky Thompson (ts, voc); Milt Jackson  (vib, voc?); (Al Haig (p); Ray Brown (b, voc?); Stan Levey (d).

Electro Broadcasting Studios, Glendale, CA.

Commercial recording for Dial Records. Ross Russell (prod).

Charlie Parker, Lester Young, and George Handy did not show up.

After negotiations between Russell and Gillespie, Gillespie's band without Parker was recorded.

 

Ross Russell in R. Reisner, Bird: The Legend of Charlie Parker (1962), 197: Russell tells in detail about the session, which took place a few days after the rehearsal session.

R. Russell, Bird Lives (1988), 205: The recording session was on the night after the rehearsal.

K. Vail, Bird's Diary (1996), 17: Gives date of February 7, 9 p.m., for the planned recording session (no source given).

CD: Gillespie/Berman/Navarro on Dial. Spotlite SPJ (CD) 132: The liner notes here have February 6.

F. R. Hayde, Stan Levey - Jazz Heavyweight (2016), Kindle ed. loc.

1057: Stan Levey states that the recording session was some days before the band left California.

I conclude that the session at latest could have taken place February 5 after midnight (February 6).

 

February 6

Dizzy Gillespie - Charlie Parker

Dizzy Gillespie and his band leave California by airplane, while Charlie Parker stays. Gillespie had in vain tried to find Parker and left his flying-ticket, which Parker afterwards converted to cash.

February 6, 1946.

 

“With the Lamplighter,” Los Angeles Daily News, February 8, 1946, 36: Dizzy Gillespie left Wednesday [February 6].

Stan Levey in D. Gillespie and A. Fraser, To Be or Not... to Bop (1979), 249.

F. R. Hayde, Stan Levey - Jazz Heavyweight (2016), Kindle ed. loc.

1057: Gillespie sent Levey out to find Parker, but in vain. Levey left Parker’s flying ticket at the hotel desk.

 

February mid

Charlie Parker

Release of Savoy 573. 

10" 78 rpm. record.

 

Recorded November 26, 1946.

Charlie Parker's Ree Boppers

Savoy 573 A

Billie's Bounce

Savoy 573 B 

Now's the Time

 

"Advance Record Releases," Billboard, February 2, 1946, 30.

“Record Reviews,” Metronome, March 1946, 29: Rating: Both sides: C+ (fair). Very critical towards Miles Davis.

“Diggin’ the Discs with Don,” Down Beat, April 22, 1946, 15: Very unfavorable review especially concerning Miles Davis.

 

 

February mid

Sir Charles Thompson

Release of Apollo 757

10" 78 rpm. record.

Charlie Parker only appears on 757 A

 

Recorded September 4, 1945

Sir Charles Thompson and His All Stars

Apollo 757 A

Takin' Off

Apollo 757 B

If I Had You

 

Apollo ad in Billboard, February 9, 1946, 23.

“Advance Record Releases,” Billboard, February 16, 1946, 36.

“Record Reviews,”  Billboard, February 23, 1946, 182: very positive review.

“Record Reviews,” Metronome, March 1946, 26: Rating: If I Had You: A- (excellent); Takin’ Of; B+ (very good).

 

February late

Charlie Parker

Charlie Parker visits Ross Russell. He apologizes for his non-appearance in the recording session and suggests a new recording date including Miles Davis, who is on his way to Los Angeles, and would arrive in a couple of weeks.

Charlie Parker gets $100 in advance and signs a formal one-year exclusive contract with Dial Records some days later.

 

R. Russell, Bird Lives (1988), 208-10: The dated contract is reprinted here.

 

February late

Charlie Parker

Chan Richardson arrives in California and contacts Charlie Parker living in a house shared with tenor sax player Gene Montgomery. Parker does not want to start a romantic relationship with her because she is pregnant with another man’s child and does not want to have an abortion. She stays in California until May.

 

Chan Parker and  F. Paudras, To Bird with Love (1981), 72: Photo of letter from Chan Richardson to  Ross Russell dated February 7, 1947 (incomplete).

R. Russell, Bird Lives (1988), 236-37: The complete letter is reprinted here.

Chan Parker (Richardson), My Life In E-Flat (1993), 24-26.

March 3

Lamplighter Jazz Session

Bob Crosby

Boyd Raeburn and the Raeburn Jazz Seven

Including Dodo Marmarosa, Jackie Mills, Lucky Thompson, Charlie Parker, and others.

Streets of Paris, Los Angeles, CA.

March 3, 1946. 2–2·30 pm: Broadcast KXLA.

Jam session till 6 pm.

Benefit for Sister Kenny Foundations.

 

Ad in Los Angeles Daily News, February 27, 1946, 27: Has Charlie Parker on the bill.

“With the Lamplighter,” Los Angeles Daily News, March 6, 1946, 23: Review giving the personnel and jam session participants:

Bob Crosby, Boyd Raeburn Jazz Seven (Lucky Thompson, Dodo Marmarosa, Jackie Mills, Harry Babasin, Britt Woodman, Ginnie Powell, H. James).

Jam session participants:

Joey Preston, Wini Beatty, Jimmie Grier, Lucky Thompson, Erroll Garner, Bob Crosby, Gil Rodin, Britt Woodman, Ginnie Powell, Delta Rhythm Boys, Mike Gould, Wingy Manone, Eddie Beal, Jim McKean, Frankie Laine, Dave Hyltone, Miss Frances of Saintone records, Hank Wayland, John Anderson, Kenny Bright, Clyde Hurley, Irving Ashby, Murray Sennett, Harry Babbit, Dodo Marmarosa, Jack Mills, Sid Gleason, J. D. Kinf, Bill Moore, Harry Fields.

Parker is not mentioned.

 

March mid?

Jazz at The Philharmonic

Al Killian, Howard McGhee (tp); Charlie Parker, Willie Smith (as); Lester Young (ts); Arnold Ross (p); Billy Hadnott (b); Lee Young (d).

Release of Disc 501 

Early April.

 

2 12" 78 rpm. records album.

 

Recorded January 28, 1946.

Norman Granz' Jazz at the Philharmonic vol. 2

Disc 2001 A

Blues for Norman (part 1)

Disc 2001 B

Blues for Norman (part 2)

Disc 2002 A

I Can't Get Started (part 1)

Disc 2002 B

I Can't Get Started (part 2)

 

“Advance Record Releases,” Billboard, March 23, 1946, 32. 

“The New Recordings,” Saturday Review, May 5, 1946, 45: Friendly review, appreciating the improvisational setting. The main soloists are listed without any specific comments.

“Record Reviews,” Metronome, June 1946, 23: Rating: Both sides; B (good).

 

March 16

Erroll Garner Trio

Charlie Parker Quintet

Charlie Parker (as); Joe Albany (p); Addison Farmer (b); Chuck Thompson (d).

Miles Davis (tp) joins the band later.

Finale Club, Los Angeles, CA.

Erroll Garner: 5:30–6:30 p.m.

Charlie Parker: 8 pm.­–midnight.

March 16–April early, 1946.

The Finale Club closed probably March late or April early.

Radio station KXLA broadcasted the shows every Saturday, Monday, and Tuesday nights at 11:30–12 p.m.

Broadcast recordings exist.

 

Ad in California Eagle, March 21, 1946, 15.

“Finale Club Opens; Features Erroll Garner, Piano Wizard,” California Eagle, March 21, 1946, 15.

T. Gioia, West Coast Jazz. Modern Jazz in California 1945–60 (1998), 22: Gives opening date March 16. No source is given.

“In Short," Billboard, March 30, 1946, 43: “...Charlie Parker, tenor saxophonist, formerly with Dizzy Gillespie, now with own 5-piece combo at Finale Club, Los Angeles...”

Art Farmer in R. Reisner, Bird: The Legend of Charlie Parker (1962), 87: gives the personnel.

Ad in California Eagle, April 18, 1946, 2.

“Finale Club Will Reopen,” California Eagle, April 18, 1946, 15: Finale re-opens April 18. Open every night at 11 p.m. On the opening bill was Roy Milton.

R. Russell, Bird Lives (1988), 206–07, 218-19.

http://bronzeville-la.ltsc.org/index.php:

About Finale club and broadcasts.

http://www.plosin.com/milesahead/BirdSessions.aspx?s=460300

 

March 19

Benny Carter Orchestra

Probably: Fred Trainer, Calvin Strickland, Walter Williams, Miles Davis (tp) Candy Ross (tb, voc); Johnny Morris, Al Grey, Charley Johnson (tb); Benny Carter (as, tp, dir, arr); Bob Graettinger, Joe Epps (as); Harold Clark, Hubert “Bumps” Myers (ts); Willard Brown (as, bars); James Cannady (g); Sonny White (p); Thomas Moultrie (b); Percy Brice (d); Lucy Elliott (voc).

Helen Humes

Harry the Hipster

Harris & Van

Orpheum Theater, Los Angeles, CA.

March 19—25, 1946.

Miles Davis arrives in California with the Benny Carter orchestra.

 

Ad in California Eagle, March 14, 1946, 14: Opening March 19.

“Out of the Horn’s Mouth,” Variety (Daily), February 26, 1946, 6.

“Stage Review,” Los Angeles Daily News, March 20, 1946, 23.

“Vaudeville Reviews: Orpheum, Los Angeles,” Billboard, March 30, 1946, 46: Reviewed March 19.

March 26

Benny Carter Orchestra

Probably: Fred Trainer, Calvin Strickland, Walter Williams, Miles Davis probably replaced by Ira Pettiford (tp) Candy Ross (tb, voc); Johnny Morris, Al Grey, Charley Johnson (tb); Benny Carter (as, tp, dir, arr); Bob Graettinger, Joe Epps (as); Harold Clark, Hubert “Bumps” Myers (ts); Willard Brown (as, bars); James Cannady (g); Sonny White (p); Thomas Moultrie (b); Percy Brice (d); Lucy Elliott (voc).

Trianon Ballroom, LA.

March 26–May 6, 1946.

KNX (CBS) had regular broadcasts 11:30–11:55 Wednesdays through Saturdays. These started March 27. The last one was on April 27.

Surviving recordings of broadcasts:

Undated: AFRS (probably a rebroadcast of a CBS broadcast).

April 30 and May.

Davis seems to have left the band during this engagement.

“With the Lamplighter,” Los Angeles Daily News, March 27, 1946, 29. Carter opened yesterday at Trianon.

“Benny Carter Plays at Trianon,” Pittsburgh Courier, May 4, 1946, 18: Engagement of 6 weeks.

Radio Programs, for Instance: “Airlanes,” Times-Delta (Visalia, CA.), March 27–April 27, 1946.

http://www.plosin.com/milesahead/Sessions.aspx?s=460400b

E. Raben (ed), Jazz Records 1942–80 vol. 3 (s.a.), 422: Lists April 30 and May 5 broadcast recordings. These are different from the AFRS broadcast.

P. Harris, “Nothing but Bop? “Stupid Says Miles,” Down Beat, January 27, 1950, 18–19:  Davis was not happy with the music of Carter’s band. He is fined by the AFM local for doubling with Charlie parker at the Finale.

M. Davis and Q. Troupe, Miles – The Autobiography (1989), 85–86: Davis had been living at Carter’s house but moved in with Lucky Thompson when he left the band. Later, he moved in with Howard McGhee.

 

 

March 27

Charlie Parker Septet

Miles Davis (tp); Charlie Parker (as); Lucky Thompson (ts); Arvin Garrison (g); Dodo Marmarosa (p); Vic McMillan (b); Chuck Thompson (d).

Finale Club, Los Angeles, CA.

Rehearsal the night before the recording date.

 

R. Russell, Bird Lives (1988), 211.

 

March 28

Charlie Parker Septet

Miles Davis (tp); Charlie Parker (as); Lucky Thompson (ts); Arvin Garrison (g); Dodo Marmarosa (p); Vic McMillan (b); Chuck Thompson (d).

Radio Recorders Studios, Hollywood, LA.

Commercial recordings for Dial Records.

Ross Russell (prod).

 

Ross Russell in R. Reisner, Bird: The Legend of Charlie Parker (1962), 197-98: Session described in detail.

R. Russell, Bird Lives (1988), 209–13: Session described in detail.

http://www.plosin.com/milesahead/Sessions.aspx?s=460328

 

 

 

 

April 1

AFRS Jubilee Show 

Probably: Fred Trainer, Calvin Strickland, Walter Williams, Miles Davis (tp) Candy Ross (tb, voc); Johnny Morris, Al Grey, Charley Johnson (tb); Benny Carter (as, tp, dir, arr); Bob Graettinger, Joe Epps (as); Harold Clark, Hubert “Bumps” Myers (ts); Willard Brown (as, bars); James Cannady (g); Sonny White (p); Thomas Moultrie (b); Percy Brice (d); Lucy Elliott (voc).

Kay Starr

Nat King Cole Trio

Nat King Cole (p); Oscar Moore (g); Johnny Miller (b),

All Stars

Benny Carter, Charlie Parker, Willie Smith (as); Nat King Cole (p); Oscar Moore (g); Johnny Miller (b); Buddy Rich (d).

Ernie "Bubbles" Whitman (mc).

NBC Studio, Hollywood, Los Angeles, CA.

April 1, 1946. 6:30–7:30 pm.

Recording of show for AFRS Jubilee.

 

”With the Lamplighter,” Los Angeles Daily News, April 5, 1946, 22: Review: This week’s Jubilee show had Kay Starr, Nat King Cole, Willie Smith, Benny Carter, and Charlie Parker.

This show gave material to AFRS Jubilee Nos. 184 and 186.

R. E. Lotz and U. Neuert, The AFRS “jubilee” Transcription Programs - An Exploratory Discography (1985), No. 184: Dates May; No. 186: Dates June. This is wrong.

The All Star-part is stated as coming from a JATP concert. This is wrong, too.

Lester Young is not mentioned in the review, so the Lester Young track on No. 184 may come  from a different session.

 “Jubilee’ Continues to Rate Raves under Whitman,” California Eagle, May 2, 1946, 15: Jubilee shows were produced on Mondays from 6:30–7:30 p.m.

http://www.plosin.com/milesahead/Sessions.aspx?s=460400a

http://www.plosin.com/milesahead/BirdSessions.aspx?s=460400c

 

April 4

Charlie Parker

Charlie Parker signs a handwritten contract giving half of his future copyrights to Emry Byrd (Moose the Mooche).

 

R. Russell, Bird Lives (1988), 213-17: The contract is shown.

April 12

Concert

Charlie Parker Orchestra

Miles Davis (tp); Britt Woodman (tb); Charlie Parker (as), Lucky Thompson (ts); Sonny White (p); Arvin Garrison (g); Red Callender (b); Perc White (d).

Swingphonic Fourtette

Eddie Beal (p); Billy Hadnott (b); Irving  Ashby, Louis Gonzales (g).

Herb Jeffries

Eddie Beal (p); Billy Hadnott (b); Irving  Ashby, Louis Gonzales (g).

Benny Carter

Sonny White (p); Arv Garrison (g); Red Callender (b); Perc White (d).

Delta Rhythm Boys

Kay Starr

Joe Graves (?) Lucky Thompson (ts); Joe Albany (p); Harry Babasin (b); Ray Hall (d).

Lester Young – Charlie Parker

Nat King Cole Trio

Royce Hall Auditorium, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA.

Benefit concert arranged by Carver Club.

Frances Kelly, Fran-tone Records, (prod.); Herb Jeffries, Exclusive Records (mc).

 

“Jazz Concert at UCLA Fri.” California Eagle, April 11, 1946, 9.

“Mixed Jazz for Tolerance,” Chicago Defender (nat. ed.), April 27, 1946, 17: Review.

"Interracial Idea Makes Hit at UCLA," Pittsburgh Courier, April 27, 1946, 19: Review.

“Ucla Jazz Concert,” Metronome, June 1946, 38: Review.

April mid

Charlie Parker

Release of Savoy 597

10" 78 rpm. record.

Parker only appears on 597-B

 

Recorded November 26, 1945.

Don Byas Quintette

How High the Moon

Charlie Parker's Ri [sic] Bop Boys

Ko

 

 Savoy ad in Billboard, April 6, 1946, 29.

"Advance Record Releases," Billboard, April 13, 1946, 124.

“Record Reviews,” Metronome, May 1946, 24: Rating: How High the Moon: B+ (very good); Ko: B (good).

 

April 21

Jam session

Charlie Parker, Teddy Edwards, Miles Davis, and Roy Porter, Warren Brackett, and others.

Club Stockade, Los Angeles, CA.

Sunday matinee.

 

Ad in California Eagle, April 18, 1946, 15.

 

 

April 22

JATP Concert

Lester Young

Coleman Hawkins

Buck Clayton

Willie Smith

Charlie Parker

Shadow Wilson

Meade Lux Lewis

Helen Humes

Ken Kersey

Irving Ashby

Arnold Ross

Red Callender

Ray Linn (tp), Corky Corcoran (ts), Billy Hadnott (b), and Buddy Rich (dr).

Embassy Auditorium, Los Angeles, CA.

8:30 p.m.

Norman Granz (prod and mc.)

Concert recorded live for Mercury Records.

 

Ad in California Eagle, April 18, 1946, 14.

“Norman Granz' Concert a Hit,” California Eagle, April 4, 1946, 15: Review. No special mention of Charlie Parker.

“No Fooling,” California Eagle, May 9, 1946, 16: Review. Nothing about Parker. The article gives explains why JATP moved away from Philharmonic Hall.

http://www.plosin.com/milesahead/BirdSessions.aspx?s=460422

R. Russell, Bird Lives (1988), 236-37: In letter from Chan Parker (Richardson) to Ross Russell, Chan Parker tells about a JATP concert where Parker is forced to leave the stage because of behavior. This could be the one. Parker is only heard soloing for three choruses on the opening blues. In the succeeding I Got Rhythm he also solos for three choruses, somewhat hesitating and not very convincing.

See P. Pullman (ed), Booklet to The Complete Jazz at the Philharmonic on Verve 1944–49, Verve 314 523 893-2 (1998), 27–30, for details of all the recordings from this concert.

 

 

 

April 26

JATP Concert

Coleman Hawkins

Lester Young

Buck Clayton

Meade Lux Lewis

Helen Humes

Oakland Auditorium Theater, Oakland, CA.

April 26, 1946. 8:30 p.m.

Parker’s presence here is probably a mistake.

 

 Ad in Oakland Tribune, April 25, 23: Parker is not mentioned in the ad.

T. Hershorn, Norman Granz: The Man Who Used Jazz for Justice (2011) Kindle ed. loc. 92–93: Mentions Parker's participation observed by Clint Eastwood.  States that it is in Shrine Auditorium Oakland. There seems to be a mistake here. Shrine is in Los Angeles. I doubt that it is the present concert that Eastwood attended. It was rather a 1948 concert.

 

April late

Dizzy Gillespie

Release of Musicraft 354.

10" 78 rpm. record.

Reissue of Guild 1002 by a new record company.

 

Recorded May 11, 1945.

Dizzy Gillespie and His All Star Quintette Featuring Vocal by Sarah Vaughan

Musicraft 354 A

Lover Man

Musicraft 354 B

Shaw 'Nuff

 

"Advance Record Releases," Billboard, April 13, 1946, 124.

 

 

April late?

Charlie Parker

In the period after the closing of the Finale Club Charlie Parker disappeared. His connection, Emry Byrd, had been arrested. Howard McGhee finds Parker living in a garage at McKinley Avenue.

R. Russell, Bird Lives (1988), 218–20. Russell states that McGhee installed Parker in his home.

Howard McGhee in I. Gitler, Swing to Bop (1985), 172: When McGhee returned from San Francisco Parker was living in a garage. McGhee do not mention that Parker moved in at his house.

In this account McGhee places his return in the period after Parker’s Dial-date (March 28) but in fact he returned from San Francisco early March.

Maybe McGhee was out of Los Angeles more than one time in this period.

 

May mid

Charlie Parker Septet

Release of Dial 1002

10” 78 rpm. record.

 

Recorded March 28, 1946.

Charlie Parker Septet

Dial 1002 A

A Night in Tunisia

Dial 1002 B

Ornithology

 

“Record Reviews,” Billboard, May 18, 1946, 137: Review: Positive, characterized as a collector’s item.

“Record Reviews,” Metronome, June 1946, 30: Rating: Both sides: B+ (very good).+

“Diggin’ the Discs with Mix: Hot Jazz,” Down Beat, July 15, 1946, 23: Ornithology: 2 notes (pleasing). A Night in Tunisia: 3 notes (tasty). Very appreciative of Parker on Tunisia.

“Diggin’ the Discs with Tom: Hot Jazz,” Down Beat, May 19, 1948, 14: Ornithology: 2 notes (pleasing). A Night in Tunisia: 3 notes (tasty).

 

 

May late

Rubberlegs Williams 

Release of Continental C-6020 

10" 78 rpm. record

 

Recorded January 4, 1945

Rubberlegs Williams with Clyde Hart's All-Stars 

Continental C-6020 A

I Want Every Bit of It

Continental C-6020 AB

4-F Blues

 

“Advance Record Releases,” Billboard, May 18, 1946, 82.

 

May late

Slim Gaillard

Release of Bel-Tone BT 753, 758, and 761.

10" 78 rpm. records.

Charlie Parker does not appear on 758 B and 761 A

 

Slim Gaillard Orchestra

 

Recorded December 17, 1945.

Bel-tone BT 753 A

Dizzy Boogie

Bel-tone BT 753 B

Popity Pop

 

Bel-tone BT 758 A

Flat Foot Floogie

Bel-tone BT 758 B

Recorded March 1946.

School Kid's Hop 

 

Bel-tone BT 761 A

Recorded March 1946.

Santa Monica Jump

Recorded December 17, 1945.

Bel-tone BT 761 B

Slim's Jam

 

Bel-Tone ad in Billboard, May 18, 1946, 38.

“Diggin’ the Discs with Mix: Swing,” Down Beat, July 15, 1946, 23: Rating: Dizzy Boogie and Popity Pop: 3 notes (tasty); Flat Foot Floogie: 2 notes (pleasing). Bel-tone 761 was not reviewed here.

 

 

May late

Charlie Parker

Release of Savoy 541.

10" 78 rpm. record.

Reissue of Savoy 532-B and (526-B) with a new series number:

 

Recorded September 15, 1944.

Charlie Parker Alto Sax

Savoy 541-A

Red Cross

Savoy 541-B

Tiny's Tempo

 

“Advance Record Releases,” Billboard, May 18, 1946, 136.

 

 

June mid

Sir Charles Thompson 

Release of Apollo 759

10" 78 rpm. record.

 

Recorded September 4, 1945.

Sir Charles Thompson and His All Stars

Apollo 759 A

20th Century Blues

Apollo 759 B

The Street Beat

 

“Advance Record Releases: Hot Jazz,” Billboard, June 8, 1946, 31.

“Record Reviews,” Metronome, August 1946, 31. Rating: Both sides: B+ (very good).

 

 

June 24

Concert

Erroll Garner

Charlie Shavers

Charlie Parker

Red Callender Trio

Lucky Thompson

Howard McGhee

Tommy Todd Trio

Calvin Jackson and Symphony artists

Embassy Auditorium, Los Angeles, CA.

June 24, 1946. 8:15 pm.

Fran-tone  presents Swingposium

Stan Kenton (mc).

 

Ad in California Eagle, June 20, 1946, 14.

“Swingposium to Attract Crowd at Embassy Auditorium,” California Eagle, June 20, 1946, 14.

 

June 28

Howard McGhee Band

Howard McGhee (tp); Charlie Parker, Sonny Criss (as); Teddy Edwards, Gene Montgomery (ts);  Earl Ecklund (Echen), Joe Albany (p);Bob Kesterson (b); Roy Porter (d);  Billy Renault (a.k.a. Bill Jones) (voc).

Tina Dixon

Princess Starletta

Four Step Brothers

Prince Spencer (mc).

Finale Club, Los Angeles, CA.

June 28–July 17.

11:45 p.m.–dawn.

 

“Howard McGhee at Finale Club,” California Eagle, June 27, 1946, 15.

“With the Lamplighter,” Los Angeles Daily  News, June 28, 1946, 22: McGhee opens tonight at after-hour spot on 1st St. with Parker, Criss, and Edwards.

Ad in California Eagle, July 25, 1946, 13.

“Los Angeles Band Briefs,” Down Beat, July 15, 1946, 6: Howard McGhee’s new band, which was figured to follow Benny Carter at Swing Club: Gives band personnel.

Sonny Criss in I. Gitler, Swing to Bop (1987), 171: Gives personnel including “sometimes Joe Albany.”

Mrs. J. T. Gibson’s Candid Comments,” California Eagle, August

“Teddy Edwards Interview” Cadence, April 1994, 11: Edwards gives the full personnel of the McGhee band that Parker played in at the time of his breakdown.

 

July

Tiny Grimes

Release of Savoy 613.

10" 78. rpm. record.

Reissue of Savoy 526-A and (532-A) 567-A with a new series number.

 

Recorded September 15, 1944.

Tiny Grimes Quintette 

Savoy 613-A

Romance Without Finance

Savoy 613-B

I’ll Always Love You Just the Same

 

“Diggin’ the Discs with Mix: Hot Jazz,” Down Beat, July 29, 1946, 15: Rating: Both sides: 3 notes (tasty. Very appreciative of Charlie Parker.

“Record Reviews,” Metronome, August 1946, 27: Rating: Il’’ Always Love You Just the Same: C+ (fair); Romance Without Finance: B (good).

 

July

Charlie Parker

Release of Dial 1003

10" 78 rpm. record. 

Parker does not appear on 1003 A

 

Recorded February 7, 1946

Tempo Jazz Men

Dial 1003 A

'Round About Midnight

Recorded March 28, 1946 

Charlie Parker Septet

Dial 1003 B

Yardbird Suite

 

Don Leary's Inc. ad in Minneapolis Sunday Tribune, July 28, 1946, 3: lists  'Round About Midnight and Yardbird Suite.

“Record Reviews,” Metronome, August 1946, 31: Rating: Both sides: B (good).

The future re-releases of Dial 1003 are messy affairs with differing couplings of tunes using the same series numbers.

 

July 9

Howard McGhee

Howard McGhee (tp); Charlie Parker, sonny Criss (as); Teddy Edwards, Gene Montgomery (ts); Earl Echen (p); Bob Kesterson (b); Roy Porter (d); Billy Renault (voc).

Swing Club, Oakland, CA.

July 9–? 1946.

Not realized.

 

Los Angeles Band Briefs,” Down Beat, July 15, 1946, 6: Howard McGhee’s new band, which was figured to follow Benny Carter at Swing Club: personnel given.

“Los Angeles Band Briefs,” Down Beat July 29, 1946, 6: McVea edges out McGhee's new band at Swing Club.

 

July 18

Howard McGhee Band

Howard McGhee (tp); Charlie Parker, Sonny Criss (as); Teddy Edwards, Gene Montgomery (ts);  Joe Albany, Earl Ecklund (Echen) (p); Bob Kesterson (b); Roy Porter (d); Billy Renault (a.k.a. Bill Jones) (voc).

Tina Dixon

Princess Starletta and Her All-Star Native Dancers

Prince Spencer (mc).

Finale Club, Los Angeles, CA.

July 18–early August.

Prince Spencer mc.

 

"Finale Books Tina Dixon," California Eagle, July 18, 1946, 13.

Ad in California Eagle, July 18, 1946, 15: Announcement of breakfast shows.

Mrs. J. T. Gibson’s Candid Comments,” California Eagle, August

8, 1946, 15: the club closed in early August.

 

July 29

Charlie Parker Quintet

Howard McGhee (tp); Charlie Parker (as); Jimmy Bunn (p); Bob Kesterson (b); Roy Porter (d).

C. P. MacGregor's Studio, Hollywood, CA.

Charlie Parker has a breakdown during the session and is sent to his hotel in a taxi.

 

http://www.plosin.com/milesahead/BirdSessions.aspx?s=460729

R. Russell, Bird Lives (1988), 221–24: tells in detail about the recording session and Parker’s breakdown.

 

July 30

Charlie Parker

Charlie Parker is arrested at the Civic Hotel, where he is living.

Later he is sentenced to treatment at the Camarillo State Hospital.

R. Russell, Bird Lives (1988), 224-226: Tells in detail about the arrest of Parker, at which he claims to be present.

“Teddy Edwards Interview” Cadence, April 1994, 11: Teddy Edwards gives a slightly differing and detailed account of the breakdown and arrest.

 

August

Charlie Parker

Release of Dial 1004.

10" 78 rpm. record. 

Parker does not appear on  1004 B

 

Recorded March 28, 1946 

Charlie Parker Septet

Dial 1004 A

Moose the Mooche

Recorded February 7, 1946

Tempo Jazz Men

Dial 1004 B

When I Grow Too Old to Dream

 

“Diggin’ the Discs with Mix: Hot Jazz,” Down Beat, August 26, 1946, 18: Rating: 2 notes (pleasing) to both sides. Rather critical to both sides.

“Record Reviews,” Metronome, October 1946, 31–32: Ratings: No stars.

The future re-releases of Dial 1004 are messy affairs with differing couplings of tunes using the same series numbers.

 

August

Jazz at the Philharmonic

Release of Disc 2005.

10” 78 rpm. record.

 

Recorded January 28, 1946.

Jazz at the Philharmonic

Disc 2005 A

Lady Be Good (part 1)

Disc 2005 B

Lady Be Good (part 2)

 

“Review of New Records,” Billboard, August 24, 1946, 32: Friendly review. 

“Diggin’ the Discs with Mix: Hot Jazz,” Down Beat, January 15, 1947, 19: Rating: 2 Notes (tasty).

 

August–December

Charlie Parker

Teddy Edwards and other musicians pay regular visits to Camarillo and are allowed to take Parker to the beach for jamming.

 

“Teddy Edwards Interview” Cadence, April 1994, 11.

August mid

Red Norvo

Release of Black & White Comet T1 recorded June 6, 1945).

2 12" 78 rpm. records album

Reissue of Comet T 6 and T 7 by a new record company in an album.

 

Recorded June 6, 1945.

Red Norvo and His Selected Sextet

Black & White T 6-A

Hallelujah

Slam Blues

Black & White T 6-B

Get Happy

Congo Blues

 

“Advance Record Releases,” Billboard, August 3, 1946, 30.

 

September

Charlie Parker

Doris Sydnor moves to California. She works as a waitress and takes contact to Charlie Parker. She stays in California and leaves with Parker in April 1947.

 

Doris Sydnor in R. Reisner, Bird: The Legend of Charlie Parker (1962), 177.

C. Woideck, Charlie Parker: His Music and Life (1996), 35, 248 notes 130–32.

 

Autumn

Charlie Parker

Ross Russell starts working for a release of Charlie Parker into his custody.

 

R. Russell, Bird Lives (1988), 232–33.

 

 

 

October early

Jazz at the Philharmonic

Release of Norman Granz' Jazz at the Philharmonic Vol. 3

Disc 503.

2 12" 78 rpm. records album.

Charlie Parker does not appear on Crazy Rhythm

 

Recorded January 28, 1946.

Jazz at the Philharmonic 

Mercury 2003 A

Crazy Rhythm (part 1)

Mercury 2003 B

Crazy Rhythm (part 2)

 

Mercury 2004 A

Sweet Georgia Brown (part 1)

Mercury 2004 B

Sweet Georgia Brown part 2)

 

“Advance Record Releases,” Billboard, September 26, 1946, 34.

“Diggin’ the Discs with Mix: Hot Jazz,” Down Beat, November 4, 1946, 18: Rating: 2 notes (pleasing) to each side. Overall, rather critical.

“Record Reviews,” Metronome, December 1946, 33: Rating: no stars.

 

October late

Slim Gaillard

Release of Majestic 9002 and 9003.

10" 78 rpm. records.

Reissue of Bel-Tone BT 753, BT 758-B, and 761-B by a new record company.

 

Recorded December 17, 1945.

Slim Gaillard and His Orchestra.

Majestic 9001 A

Popity Pop

Majestic 9001 B

Slim's Jam

Majestic 9002 A

Dizzy Boogie

Majestic 9002 B

Flat Foot Floogie

 

“Advance Record Releases,” Billboard, October 12, 1946, 32–33, 108: Majestic 9001

“Diggin’ the Discs with Mix: Swing,” Down Beat, November 4, 1946, 18: Rating: Popity Pop, Slim’s Jam and Flat Foot Floogie: 2 notes (pleasing). Dizzy Boogie: 3 notes (tasty).

“Record Reviews,” Metronome, December 1946, 30–31: Rating: no stars.

 

November early?

Bebop Jazz

Release of Dial D1

3 10" 78 rpm. records album.  These records were also sold as singles.

Parker appears only on 1006 B and 1007.

 

Recorded September 21, 1946.

Sonny Berman's Big Eight

Dial 1006 A

Sonny Berman's Big Eight

Curbstone Scuffle

Recorded March 28, 1946.

Charlie Parker Septet

Dial 1006 B

Bird Lore (Ornithology alt. take)

 

Recorded July 29, 1946.

Dial 1007 A

Howard McGhee Quintet

Bebop 

Dial 1007 B

Charlie Parker

Lover Man

 

Recorded February 7, 1946.

Tempo Jazz Men 

Dial 1008 A

Confirmation

Recorded September 21, 1946.

Ralph Burns Quintet

Dial 1008 B

Dial-ogue

 

“Advance Record Releases,” Billboard, November 9, 1946, 33 and 102, mentions Dial 1005 (Diggin’ for Diz and Trumpet at Tempo).

Record Haven ad in Pittsburgh Courier, November 30, 1946, 19.

http://birdparkerslegacy.com/record_t.html

“Record Reviews,” Metronome, November 1946, 32: Dial 1007 reviewed as a single: Rating: no stars.

“Diggin’ the Discs with Mix: Hot Jazz,” Down Beat, January 1, 1947, 18: Rating: Curbstone Scuffle: 3 notes (pleasing); Bird Lore: 2 notes (tasty); Be-Bop: 3 notes (pleasing); Lover Man: 3 notes (pleasing); Confirmation: 3 notes (pleasing); Dial-oque: 3 notes (pleasing).

“Diggin’ the Discs with Tom: Combo Jazz,” Down Beat, June 16,

1948, 14: Dial 1006 reviewed as single: Rating: Bird Lore: 2 Stars (tedious).

“Diggin’ the Discs with Tom: Combo Jazz,” Down Beat, June 16, 1948, 14–15: Dial 1007 reviewed as single: Rating: Both sides: 3 Stars (tasty).

 

November 25

Concert

Erroll Garner Trio,

Al Killian and His Orchestra

Howard McGhee and His Orchestra

Russell Jacquet, Red Callender, Ray Linn, Benny Carter, Barney Kessel, Herbie Steward, Lucky Thompson, Artie Shapiro, Wini Beatty, Earle Spencer, and others.

Club Royale, Los Angeles, CA.

Charlie Emgee, Los Angeles Down Beat department (prod), Gene Norman (mc).

Benefit for Charlie Parker.

Ross Russell also mentions himself, Eddie Laguna, Maynard Sloate, and June Poole (Orr) as involved in arranging the event.

 

“Charlie Parker Benefit at Club Royale,” California Eagle, November 21, 1945, 19.

“Charley Parker Benefit Success,” Pittsburgh Courier, December 7, 1946, 19: Review. Net total of $500.

“Billy Rowe’s Note Book,” California Eagle, December 14, 1946, 18: The benefit gave $600.

“Parker Fund Does Fine at L. A. Benefit,” Down Beat, December 16, 1946, 8.: net of $500.86.

Ross Russell in R. Reisner, Bird: The Legend of Charlie Parker (1962), 200, 239: Dates December.

R. Russell, Bird Lives (1988), 233.

 

 

 

Late in the year?

Hot Jazz

Release of Continental 27

3 10" 78 rpm. records album.

Reissues of Continental C-5809, C-6012, and C-6013 in an album.

Charlie Parker appears only on C-6013.

 

Recorded December 1, 1944

Leonard Feather and His All Stars:

Continental C-5809-A

Esquire Jump

Continental C-5809-B 

Esquire Stomp

 

Recorded August 22, 1945.

Timmie Rosenkrantz and His Barons

Continental C-6012-A

Bouncy

Continental C-6012-B

Blue at Dawn

 

Recorded January 4, 1945.

Clyde Hart's All Stars:

Continental C-6013-A

What’s the Matter Now 

Continental C-6013-B

That's the Blues

 

Probably late in the year. The description is taken from Bird's Legacy

http://birdparkerslegacy.com/record_t.html

 

 

December 1

Charlie Parker

In a letter Charlie Parker asks Ross Russell to get him out of Camarillo at once.

 

R. Russell, Bird Lives (1988), 234.

C. Woideck, Charlie Parker: His Music and Life (1996), 35–36, 248 note 133.

December 24

Charlie Parker

In a letter the Superintendent of Camarillo, Thomas W. Haggerty, says that a release at the present time is not considered in the interest of Charlie Parker.

 

R. Russell, Bird Lives (1988), 234.

C. Haddix, Bird -The Life and Music of Charlie Parker (2013), 101 note 42: Letter in Russell Collection.