1942

Charlie Parker Chronology

 

 

 

 

Created by Leif Bo Petersen

Last updated: November 7, 2017.

 

Date

Event

References/Further Details

 

January 3

Jay McShann’s Decca Recording Orchestra

Probably: Buddy Anderson, Orville Minor, Bob Merrill (tp); Lawrence Anderson, Joe Taswell Baird (tb); Charlie Parker, John Jackson (as); Freddie Culliver, Bob Mabane (ts); James Coe (bar); Jay McShann (p); Lucky Enois (g); Gene Ramey (b); Gus Johnson (d); Walter Brown, Al Hibbler (voc).

Tootie’s Mayfair, Kansas City, MO.

January 3–?, 1942.

Dancing 9:30–3·30; 5-act Floor Show.

 

Ad in Kansas City Star, January 3, 1942, 3.

Ad in Kansas City Star, January 9, 1942, 14.

February early

 

Jay McShann Orchestra

Jay McShann gets a 7 years contract with the Moe Gale Agency. The deal was made with John B. Tumino, McShann's manager.

 

“Orchestra Notes,” Billboard, February 7, 1942, 26.

“Gale Hooks McShann for Seven-Year Cut,” Baltimore Afro-American, February 10, 1942, 8.

“McShann Now a Member of Ink Spot’s Stable,” Chicago Defender (Nat. ed.), February 14, 1942, 21.

 

February 8

Jay McShann Orchestra

King Kolax Band

Savoy Ballroom, Chicago, IL.

Band Battle.

 

Ad in Chicago Defender, February 7, 1942, 9.

“Jay McShann, Recording Sensation, Battles Kolax at Savoy Sunday,” Chicago Defender, February 7, 1942, 10.

February 13

Lucky Millinder Orchestra

Jay McShann Orchestra

Savoy Ballroom, New York, NY.

February 13–February 20, 1942.

February 14 (Friday 13 after midnight):

NBC Blue Network broadcast, 12:05–12:30 a.m. Bill Abernhathy (mc).

Private lacquer (acetate) recordings exist. These are usually dated February 13. According to Gene Ramey the band was late for the opening. This may explain that McShann got the radio spot instead of the announced Millinder band.

February 15:

NBC Blue Network broadcast, 4:00–4:30 p.m.

Gene Ramey and Jay McShann remember a Sunday matinee broadcast from Savoy, running over time because of a long Charlie Parker Cherokee-solo. Ramey tells that this was the first Sunday at the Savoy. Radio logs have Millinder announced, but it was not unusual that two bands shared the spot. No recordings of this broadcast seem to have survived.

February 18 (Tuesday 17 after midnight):

NBC Blue Network broadcast, 12:05–12:30 a.m.: Lucky Millinder. No recordings of this broadcast seem to have survived.

February 21 (Friday 20 after midnight):

NBC Blue Network broadcast, 12:05–12:30 a.m.: Lucky Millinder. No recordings of this broadcast seem to have survived.

 

“On the Upbeat,” Variety, January 28, 1942, 38: Gives opening date February 13.

“Orchestra Routes,” Billboard, February 7, 1942, 26: Millinder at Savoy (no dates). Fitzgerald at Savoy February 2–12.

“Gale Hooks McShann for Seven-Year Cut,” Baltimore Afro-American, February 10, 1942, 8: Has opening on “Saturday” [14].

“Orchestra Routes,” Billboard, February 14, 1942, 26: Erskine Hawkins at Savoy February 20–26.

“Orchestra Routes,” Billboard, February 21, 1942, 24, Millinder at Savoy (no dates). Fitzgerald at the Apollo February 13–19, and at Savoy February 20–28.

“Band Routes,” Pittsburgh Courier, February 14, 1942, 20: Erskine Hawkins at Savoy week of February 21.

Gene Ramey in S. Dance, The World of Count Basie (1980) 276-77: Has opening on Friday, February 13. He tells in details of the opening night, but does not mention a broadcast situation here. Instead he tells of a Sunday afternoon broadcast on the first Sunday.

“Radio programs,” New York Sun, February 13, 1942, 34: WJZ: 12:05–12:30 a.m.: Lucky Millinder.

http://www.plosin.com/milesahead/BirdSessions.aspx?s=420213

“Sunday’s Radio Programs,” New York Sun, February 14, 1942, 10: WNEW: 4:00– 4:30 p.m.: Lucky Millinder.

“Radio programs,” New York Sun, February 17, 1942, 24: WNEW: 12:05–12:30 a.m.: Lucky Millinder.

“Radio programs,” New York Sun, February 20, 1942, 19: WJZ: 12:05–12:30 a.m.: Lucky Millinder.

 

February–May

Jam sessions

Minton’s Playhouse, New York, NY.

Monroe’s Uptown House, New York, NY.

Charlie Parker is reported in Jam sessions here.

Private lacquer (acetate) recording by Jerry Newman exists:

Vic Coulsen, George Treadwell (tp); Charlie Parker (as); Unidentified (as); Unidentified (as); (ts); Unidentified (g); Allan Tinney (p); Ebenezer Paul (b); Little Phil Phillips.

Monroe’s Uptown House, New York, NY.

Early 1942.

 

Allen Tinney in I. Gitler, Swing to Bop (1985), 75.

Kenny Clarke in I. Gitler, Swing to Bop (1985), 82.

http://www.plosin.com/milesahead/BirdSessions.aspx?s=420000

 

March 7

Jay McShann Orchestra

Sunset Auditorium, Indianapolis, IN.

March 7–22, 1942.

 

 “Band Routes,” Pittsburgh Courier, March 21, 20: March 7–22.

March 27

Jay McShann Orchestra

Mills Brothers

Nina May McKinney (voc)

Hawley & Lee (comedy)

Edward Sisters

Paradise, Detroit, MI.

March 27–April 2, 1942.

 

Ad in Detroit Free Press, March 27, 1942, 9.

“Mills Brothers at Paradise,” Detroit Free Press, March 30, 1942, 11.

Ad in Detroit Free Press, April 2, 1942, 10: tomorrow: Lucky Millinder and Rosetta Tharpe.

 

April 4

Jay McShann Orchestra

Edgar Hays Orchestra?

Savoy Ballroom, New York, NY.

April 4-16, 1942.

Parker is fired from the band during this engagement.

April 5: I have not been able to identify a Savoy Ballroom broadcast this Sunday.

April 8 (Tuesday 7 after midnight):

NBC Blue Network broadcast 12:05­–12:30 a.m.: McShann.

No recordings of this broadcast seem to have survived.

April 11 (Friday 10 after midnight):

NBC Blue Network broadcast 12:05­–12:30 a.m.: Jay McShann.

No recordings of this broadcast seem to have survived.

April 12:

NBC Blue Network broadcast 5:30–6:00 p.m.: Jay McShann.

No recordings of this broadcast seem to have survived.

April 15: (Tuesday 14 after midnight):

NBC Blue Network broadcast 12:05­–12:30 a.m.: Jay McShann.

No recordings of this broadcast seem to have survived.

 

“Orchestra Routes,” Billboard, April 4, 1942, 24: McShann at Savoy April 4–16.

S. DeVeaux, The Birth of Bebop (1997), 194: McShann played opposite Edgar Hays here.

 “In the Groove at the Apollo,” Baltimore Afro-American, April 25, 1942, 13: Photo of the full band at the Savoy prior to the Apollo engagement.

Gene Ramey in S. Dance, The World of Count Basie (1980), 277: Tells of Charlie Parker being fired here.

“Sunday’s Radio Programs,” New York Sun, April 4, 1942, 16: WJZ: 5:30–6:00 p.m.: Musical Variety.

“Radio Programs,” New York Sun, April 7, 1942, 22: WJZ: 12:05­–12:30 a.m.: Jay McShann.

“Radio Programs,” New York Sun, April 10, 1942, 41: WJZ: 12:05­–12:30 a.m.: Jay McShann.

“Sunday’s Radio Programs,” New York Sun, April 11, 1942, 14: WJZ: 5:30–6:00 p.m.: Jay McShann.

“Radio Programs,” New York Sun, April 14, 1942, 35: WJZ: 12:05­–12:30 a.m.: Jay McShann.

 

April early

Jam sessions

Monroe’s, New York, NY.

April early –May?

Parker is working in New York without regular payment in the interim before he gets back to McShann, probably mostly at Minton’s.

 

Gene Ramey in S. Dance, The World of Count Basie (1980), 277.

Allen Tinney in I. Gitler, Swing to Bop (1985), 80.

 

April 17

Jay McShann and His Band and Singers

Buddy Anderson, Orville Minor, Bob Merrill (tp); Lawrence Anderson, Joe Taswell Baird (tb); John Jackson (as); Freddie Culliver, Bob Mabane (ts); James Coe (as, bars); Jay McShann (p); Lucky Enois (g); Gene Ramey (b); Gus Johnson (d); Walter Brown, Al Hibbler (voc).

4 Kings and a Queen

Conway & Parks (Dance, song)

“Pigmeat” (Comedian)

Arnault Family (Violin comedy)

Willie Dee (Magician)

“Wolf Man”

Apollo Theater, New York, NY.

April 17-23.

Charlie Parker was out of the band here. The band’s baritone–sax, Jimmy Coe played his alto-solos.

 

Ad in New York Age, April 18, 1942, 10.

“House Reviews: Apollo,” Variety, April 22, 1942: 49:

 “McShann Scoring Big Hit in Eastern Appearance,” New York Amsterdam News, April 25, 1942, 16: Gives the personnel of the band. Charlie Parker is not included. R. L. Campbell: The Jimmy Coe Discography.

http://hubcap.clemson.edu/~campber/coe.html

“At age 20 Jimmy Coe was already touring with the Jay McShann band, which he probably joined toward the end of 1941… He even had the unenviable task of briefly replacing Charlie Parker on alto saxophone (when the McShann band played the Apollo in New York City, April 1942). Coe always said later that Charlie Parker was in the audience–and fell asleep–while he soloed on alto for the first time during a performance! Coe played alto alongside John Jackson for a little while, but while Charlie Parker was in the band his instrument was baritone sax.”

 

 

April 24

Jay McShann Orchestra

Royal Theatre, Baltimore, MD.

April 24-30, 1942.

Charlie Parker may not yet have rejoined McShann here.

 

“Orchestra Routes,” Billboard, April 25, 1942, 24.

Gene Ramey in S. Dance, The World of Count Basie (1980), 277.

May 5

Jay McShann Orchestra

Probably: Buddy Anderson, Orville Minor, Bob Merrill (tp); Lawrence Anderson, Joe Taswell Baird (tb); Charlie Parker, John Jackson (as); Freddie Culliver, Jimmy Forrest (ts, bars); James Coe (bars); Jay McShann (p); Lucky Enois (g); Gene Ramey (b); Gus Johnson (d); Walter Brown, Al Hibbler (voc).

Marine Barracks, Brooklyn Navy Yard, New York, NY.

Parker probably rejoined McShann here or shortly after.

 

“Jump Bands to Play Under USO,” Baltimore Afro-American, May 2, 1942, 15.

Gene Ramey in S. Dance, The World of Count Basie (1980), 277.

“Orchestra Routes,” Billboard, May 9, 1942, 26.

A. McCarthy, Big Band Jazz (1974), 152: Bob Mabane left for the Army already around May and was replaced by Jimmy Forrest.

B. Priestley, Chasin’ the Bird (2006), 141: Has Jimmy Forrest replacing Bob Mabane and James Coe. 

Jimmy Forrest in R. Reisner: Bird: The Legend of Charlie Parker (1962), 92: Forrest tells of being in the band, while it was playing at the Savoy, but it could have been later in the year.

 

May 8

Jay McShann Orchestra

Eltinge Theatre, New York, NY.

May 8-14, 1942.

 

 

May 15?

Jay McShann Orchestra

Erskine Hawkins

Savoy Ballroom, New York, NY.

May 15?–30?.

I have not been able to verify McShann on Savoy broadcasts in this period. The broadcasts I have found are all by Erskine Hawkins.

 

“Orchestra Routes,” Billboard, May 16, 1942, 32: Erskine Hawkins at Savoy 11-31. McShann at Savoy May 15—30. 

“Band Routes,” Pittsburgh Courier, May 16, 20: Erskine Hawkins at the Savoy, May 11—31. Jay McShann at the Savoy, May 16—22.

“Orchestra Routes,” Billboard, May 30, 1942: 24: Erskine Hawkins Savoy 11-31. McShann at Savoy May 15—30.

 

May 31

Jay McShann Orchestra

Memorial Auditorium, Dayton, OH.

 

“Bands on Tour – Advance Dates,” Billboard, May 30, 1942, 24.

June early

Jay McShann Orchestra

Canton, OH.

This may alternatively belong to August.

 

C. Woideck, Charlie Parker. His Music and Life (1996), 24, 247 note 91; Al Hibbler tells an episode from here.

June 6

Jay McShann Orchestra

New Allen Ballroom, Dayton, OH.

 

“Orchestra Routes,” Billboard, June 6, 1942, 24.

“Band Routes,” Pittsburgh Courier, June 6, 1942, 21.

June 7

Jay McShann Orchestra

Savoy Ballroom, Chicago, IL.

 

“Band Routes,” Pittsburgh Courier, June 6, 1942, 21: Dates June 14.

This date was changed to June 7:

Ad in Chicago Defender, June 6, 1942, 24: “Dancing June 7 Jay McShann and His Orchestra direct from their smash success in New York” This ad also announces King Kolax on June 14.

 

June 19

Jay McShann Orchestra

Regal Theatre, Chicago, IL.

Probably June 19–25, 1942.

 

“Miniatures from the Fine Arts,” Plaindealer (Kansas City, KS), May 29, 1942, 6: opening at the Regal June 14.

Ad in Chicago Defender, June 13, 1942, 11: Has Tiny Bradshaw at the Regal June 12–18.

 

June late

Lucky Millinder Orchestra

Probably including Dizzy Gillespie (tp); Thelonious Monk (p).

Erskine Hawkins Orchestra

Jay McShann Orchestra

Savoy Ballroom, New York, NY.

June late—July early

June 28:

NBC Blue Network broadcast 5:30—6:00 p.m.: Jay McShann.

No recordings of this broadcast seem to have survived.

June 29 (Sunday 28 after midnight):

NBC Blue Network broadcast 12:05—12:30 a.m.: Jay McShann.

No recordings of this broadcast seem to have survived.

July 5 (Sunday 4 after midnight):

NBC Blue Network broadcast 12:05—12:30 a.m.: Jay McShann.

No recordings of this broadcast seem to have survived.

 

“Orchestra Routes,” Billboard, June 20, 1942: 24: Millinder at Savoy June 20—30. Erskine Hawkins at Savoy June 1—30.

I. Gitler, Jazz Masters of the 40s (1984), 71: Gillespie joins Millinder after his engagement with Les Hite.

A. Shipton, Groovin' High (1999), 103: Exactly when Dizzy joined the band is unclear. Millinder seems to have been on the road a lot with his new band, and reports show that in early 1942 he played throughout the South and Midwest, with dates in Nashville, Tampa, San Antonio, Houston, and Indianapolis. During Dizzy's time in Les Hite's band Lucky was in Chicago, but he made his way back to New York via Detroit, Baltimore, and Washington, D.C, ending up at the Savoy on May 30. It is most likely that Dizzy joined Millinder there.

Apart from the review below and the broadcast in the radio logs, I have found no further documentation for a McShann engagement at the Savoy June late.

 “Radio,” New York Sun, June 26, 1942, 22: WJZ. 12:05—12:30 a.m.: Buddy Franklin Orchestra.

“The Week’s Radio programs: Today Sunday, June 28, 1942,” New York Times, June 28, 1942,?: WNEW: 5:30: News-Music.

“Sunday programs,” New York Sun, June 27, 1942, 10: WNEW: 5:30–6:00 p.m.: News.

“On the Air: Jay McShann,” Billboard, July 11, 1942, 20: Review: WNEW: Sunday, June 28, 5:30—6 p.m.

 “Sunday programs,” New York Sun, June 27, 1942, 10: WJZ. 12:05—12:30 a.m.: Jay McShann.

“Sunday’s Radio Programs,” Utica Daily Press (NY.), July 4, 1942, 4: WJZ: 12:05: Jay McShann Orchestra.

 

July 2

Jay McShann Orchestra

Probably: Buddy Anderson, Orville Minor, Bob Merrill (tp); Lawrence Anderson, Joe Taswell Baird (tb); Charlie Parker, John Jackson (as); Freddie Culliver, Jimmy Forrest (ts); Jay McShann (p); Lucky Enois (g); Gene Ramey (b); Doc West (dr); Walter Brown, Al Hibbler (voc).

Decca Studio, New York, NY.

Commercial recordings for Decca.

 

http://www.plosin.com/milesahead/BirdSessions.aspx?s=420702

 

July 3

Jay McShann Orchestra

Nu-Elm Ballroom, Youngstown, OH.

The band bus burns up on the road to Youngstown. The gig is cancelled.

“Band Routes,” Pittsburgh Courier, June 27, 1942, 21.

“Jay McShann’s Bus Burns Up,” Plaindealer (Kansas City, KS), July 17, 1942, 1.

The band s one-nighters in the following weeks may also have been cancelled.

 

July 4

Jay McShann Orchestra

Soho Community Center, Pittsburgh, PA.

Probably cancelled.

 

“Band Routes,” Pittsburgh Courier, June 27, 1942, 21.

July 5

Jay McShann Orchestra

Cotton Club, Cincinnati, OH.

Opening July 5, 1942.

Probably cancelled.

 

“Band Routes,” Pittsburgh Courier, June 27, 1942, 21.

July 10

Jay McShann Orchestra

Castle Ballroom, St. Louis, MO.

Probably cancelled.

 

“Band Routes,” Pittsburgh Courier, June 27, 1942, 21.

“Two Kings from Tunetown,” Lincoln Star, July 19, 1942, D6: McShann comes directly from Tune Town.

July 11

Jay McShann Orchestra

Recreation Center, DeWitt, IA.

Probably cancelled.

 

“Band Routes,” Pittsburgh Courier, June 27, 1942, 21.

“Two Kings from Tunetown,” Lincoln Star, July 19, 1942, D6: McShann comes directly from Tune Town.

 

July 13

Jay McShann Orchestra

Auditorium, Moberly, MO.

Probably cancelled.

 

“Band Routes,” Pittsburgh Courier, June 27, 1942, 21.

July mid?

Jay McShann Orchestra

Tune Town Ballroom, St. Louis, MO.

 

“Two Kings from Tunetown,” Lincoln Star, July 19, 1942, D6: McShann comes directly from Tune Town.

 

July 18

Jay McShann Orchestra

King’s Ballroom, Lincoln, NE.

July 18–August 2, 1942.

 

“Band Routes,” Pittsburgh Courier, June 27, 1942, 21: McShann at King’s July 14–26.

“Count Basie Precedes Jay McShann at Kings,” Lincoln Star, July 12, 1942, D6: McShann opens July 18.

Ad in Lincoln Star, July 18, 1942, 2.

Ad in Lincoln Star, July 25, 1942, 2: Held over for a second week.

Ad in Lincoln Star, August 2, 1942, D6: Last night.

 

August 8

Jay McShann Orchestra

Fort Worth, TX.

“Band Routes,” Pittsburgh Courier, August 1, 1942, 21.

 

August 9

Jay McShann Orchestra

City Auditorium, Dallas, TX.

“Band Routes,” Pittsburgh Courier, August 1, 1942, 21.

 

August 10

Jay McShann Orchestra

Library Auditorium, San Antonio, TX

8:00 p.m. Dancing.

 

“Band Routes,” Pittsburgh Courier, August 1, 1942, 21.

Ad in San Antonio Light, August 7, 1942, 13: Walter Brown, Al Hibbler.

 

August 13

Jay McShann Orchestra

Cotton Club, Port Arthur, TX.

 

“Orchestra Routes,” Billboard, August 15, 1942, 24.

August 14

Jay McShann Orchestra

Temple Roof Garden, Baton Rouge, LA.

 

“Orchestra Routes,” Billboard, August 15, 1942, 24.

August 15

Jay McShann Orchestra

Rhythm Club, New Orleans, LA.

 

“Orchestra Routes,” Billboard, August 15, 1942, 24.

August 19

Jay McShann Orchestra

City Auditorium, Atlanta, GA.

 

“Jay McShann & Orchestra to Have ‘Cats’ A-Jumpin’, Atlanta Daily World, August 14, 1942, 3.

August 21

Jay McShann Orchestra

Auditorium, Columbus, OH.

 

“Orchestra Routes,” Billboard, August 15, 1942, 24.

August 22

Jay McShann Orchestra

Memorial Auditorium, Dayton, OH.

 

Orchestra Routes,” Billboard, August 22, 1942, 23.

August 28

Jay McShann Orchestra

Regal Theater, Chicago, IL.

August 28–September 3, 1942.

 

Ad in Chicago Defender, August 28, 1942, 11.

September 8

Jay McShann Orchestra

Probably: Buddy Anderson, Orville Minor, Bob Merrill (tp); Lawrence Anderson, Joe Taswell Baird, Clyde Bernhardt (tb); Charlie Parker, Joe Evans (as); Freddie Culliver, Jimmy Forrest (ts); Albert McCain (bar); Jay McShann (p); Lucky Enois (g); Gene Ramey (b); Gus Johnson (d); Walter Brown, Al Hibbler (voc).

Cootie Williams orchestra

(Probably closing September 11)

Sabby Lewis Orchestra

(September 12–17).

Tiny Bradshaw Orchestra

 (September 18–30).

Savoy Ballroom, New York, NY.

September 8–October mid.

October 11:

Blue Network Sunday afternoon broadcast.

It has not been possible to identify such a broadcast on October 11.

 

“Orchestra Notes,” Billboard, August 15, 1942, 23: Cootie Williams opening at Savoy August 23.

 “Orchestra Notes,” Billboard, Saturday, September 12, 1942, 21: Sabby Lewis into Savoy Saturday (12).

“Orchestra Routes,” Billboard, Saturday, September 19, 1942, 24: Bradshaw at Savoy September 18–30.

Clyde Bernhardt interviewed by Phil Schaap, WKCR, has related that he rehearsed with the McShann Orchestra at the Savoy in New York on September 7, and that he played in public there with the band from September 8.

Hoard McGhee in R. Reisner, Bird: The Legend of Charlie Parker (1962), 143: McGhee playing with Charlie Barnet at the Adams Theatre, Newark, NJ., listens to a Sunday afternoon broadcast having Parker soloing on Cherokee. He rushes to Savoy to meet Parker. “Orchestra Routes,” Billboard, October 10, 24, 1942, 24: Barnet at Adams, Newark, October 8–14. “Variety Bills,” Variety, October 7, 1942, 80: Barnet opening at Adams, Newark on October 9. “Variety Bills,” Variety, October 14, 1942, 80: Sammy Kay opening at Adams, New Ark on October 16.

Apart from October 2 (see below) it has not been possible to verify McShann at Savoy otherwise in this period.

A. McCarthy, Big Band Jazz (1974), 152: some personnel for the last part of the year is listed with Joe Evans as source.

 

October 2

Jay McShann Orchestra

Savoy Sultans

Savoy Ballroom, New York, NY.

Autumn Dance sponsored by the Benedict College Club of New York City.

 

Benedict College Club Sponsors Fall Dance,” New York Age, September 26, 1942, 5.

October 16

Jay McShann Orchestra

Howard Theater, Washington, D.C.

October 16–22, 1942

Hines came and heard the band in Washington in order to recruit some of McShann’s musicians, among others Charlie Parker.

 

“Band Routes,” Pittsburgh Courier, October 24, 1942, 21.

 “Variety Bills,” Variety, October 14, 1942: 48.

Jay McShann in: S. Dance, The World of Count Basie. (1980), 247.

Earl Hines cannot be verified in Washington in this period, but according to the band itinerary, there was room a visit there between October 15 and 23.

Ad in New York Amsterdam News, October 10, 1942, 17: Hines at the Apollo, New York, October 9–15.

S. Dance, The World of Earl Hines (1977), 301: Hines at Paradise, Detroit, October 23–29.

 

October 26

Jay McShann Orchestra

Baltimore; MD.

Monday one-nighter.

 

“Jay McShann Band Plays Baltimore,” Baltimore Afro-American, October 20, 1942, 10: Monday one-nighter in Baltimore after the Howard gig.

 

October late

Jay McShann and His Orchestra

Release of Decca 4387 (recorded July 2, 1942):

Lonely Boy Blues

Sepian Bounce

 

“The Week’s Records: Popular,” Billboard, October 31. 1942, 25: released October 21—27.

 

October 30

Jay McShann Orchestra

Including Walter Brown (voc)

Walter Richardson (voc)

Three Peter Sisters

Buck and Bubbles

Paradise Theater, Detroit, MI

October 30—November 5, 1942.

During this engagement Charlie Parker had an OD and was unable to proceed with McShann, who makes Andy Kirk give Parker a lift to New York

"Buck and Bubbles on coming Paradise Bill," Detroit Free Press, October 29, 10.

Ad in Detroit Free Press, October 30, 11.

“Night Clubs - Vaudeville: Paradise, Detroit,” Billboard, November 13, 1942, 16: Review on October 30.

Jay McShann in R. Reisner, Bird: The Legend of Charlie Parke (1962), 150: dates this episode to the end of 1942.

No evidence has been found of a Kirk engagement in Detroit in October/November, but his itinerary is not fully revealed. He seems to have played one-nighters after closing at the Apollo, New York on October 29 and opening at the Tic Toc in Boston on November 8.

"Top Crowd Expected at Mask Ball," Baltimore Afro-American, October 24, 1942, 16: Andy Kirk at Laurel Gardens, New Ark, NJ., October 31.

Ad in Lebanon Daily News, October 30, 1942, 17: Andy Kirk at Chestnut Street Hall, Harrisburg, PA., November 1, starting at midnight.

Ad in Evening Times (Cumberland, MD), November 3, 11: Andy Kirk at Maryland Theater, Cumberland, MD., November 3.

 

November

Charlie Parker

Having left McShann Parker settles in New York. He is without regular jobs.

 

R. Russell: Bird Lives, (1988), 137.

S. DeVeaux; The Birth of Bebop, (1997), 234.

 

 

November–December

Jam sessions

Monroe’s Uptown House, New York, NY.

Minton’s Playhouse, New York, NY.

Kelly’s Stable, New York, NY.

November–December 1942.

Parker played jam sessions in these venues, sometimes in company with Dizzy Gillespie.

 

A. Shipton, Groovin' High (1999), 104-06.

S. DeVeaux, The Birth of Bebop (1997), 282.

I. Gitler, Swing to Bop (1985), 75-77.

R. Russell, Bird Lives, (1988), 137.

December

Earl Hines Orchestra

Minton’s, New York, NY.

Earl Hines’ Orchestra is rehearsing in New York. Hines goes to Minton’s and listens to Parker jamming. He hires Parker for the second tenor-sax chair replacing Budd Johnson.

 

Budd Johnson in S. Dance, The World of Earl Hines (1977), 301.

Earl Hines S. Dance, The World of Earl Hines (1977), 110.

Billy Eckstine in R. Reisner, Bird: The Legend of Charlie Parker (1962), 84-85.

December 25

Earl Hines and his Great New Orchestra

Possibly:  Gail Brockman, Shorty McConnell, Little Benny Harris, Dizzy Gillespie (tp); Gus Chappell, Bennie Green, Howard Scott (tb); Scoops Carey, Goon Gardner (as); Thomas Crump, Charlie Parker (ts); John Williams (bar); Earl Hines (p); Connie Wainwright (g); Jesse Simpkins (b); Shadow Wilson (d); Julia Gardner (accordion, voc); Sarah Vaughan (voc, p); Julia Gardner (accordion, voc); Madeline Green, Billy Eckstine (voc).

Savoy Sultans

Golden Gate Ballroom, New York, NY.

Xmas Day and Nite.

 

Ad in New York Amsterdam News, December 19, 1942, 15.