1944

Charlie Parker Chronology

 

 

 

Created by Leif Bo Petersen

Last updated: November 18, 2017.

 

Date

Event

References/Further Details

 

January early–April early

Charlie Parker

Parker can be documented in Kansas City until November late 1943.  I have no further information of his activities until he shows up in Chicago.

He is rumored to have played with Cootie Williams, and Andy Kirk before he joined Eckstine’s band.

My studies of itineraries seem to disprove this concerning Kirk. Concerning the Williams band, I have found no indications that Parker was in the band, but as Williams was touring in the Midwest in the first part of the year, I cannot disprove it.

L. Feather, Inside Jazz (1977), 13: Parker worked briefly with Cootie Williams and Andy Kirk before joining the Eckstine band.

B. Eckstine: "Leading My Own Outfit." Melody Maker, August 28, 1954, 19: Parker had been working with Andy Kirk and Noble Sissle, but was in Chicago when Eckstine contacted him for joining his band.

L. B. Petersen and T. Rehak, The Music and Life of Theodore “Fats” Navarro – Infatuation (2009), 25: Here is a discussion of Parker in relation to the Kirk band. See also page 340: Kirk’s band was in California from February 10–April and returned to the Midwest in May.

Cootie Williams was touring in the Midwest from January mid ending up in California April 12.

It has been suggested that Parker is on recordings by Jay McShann and Cootie Williams from early 1944, but these are from Californian AFRS Jubilee shows. Parker was not present there.

http://www.plosin.com/milesahead/BirdSessions.aspx?s=440000

http://www.plosin.com/milesahead/BirdSessions.aspx?s=440800

 

March 31

Jesse Miller Band

Jesse Miller (tp); Goon Gardner, A. K. Salim (as); Argonne Thornton (a.k.a. Sadik Hakim) (p); Ike Day (d);

Joe's Deluxe Club, Chicago, IL.

March 31–?

Charlie Parker shows up at a Jesse Miller engagement here.

Ad in Chicago Defender, March 18, 1944, 11: Jesse Miller opens at Joe's Deluxe Club on March 31.

Ad in Chicago Defender, April 1, 1944, 11: Jesse Miller at Joe's DeLuxe club.

Sadik Hakim (a.k.a. Argonne Thornton): “Reflections of an Era - My Experiences with Bird and Prez” Jazz Journal, August 1996, 18: “One night we were playing Stompin' At the Savoy for the chorus girls when, out of the blue we heard this horn from the front of the club playing over the top of the band. I looked up and saw Charlie Parker... I started hanging out with Bird in Chicago…”

 

April

Billy Eckstine Orchestra

Eckstine sends telegram to Charlie Parker inviting him to participate in the band he was in the process of creating.

 

B. Eckstine: “Leading My Own Outfit,” Melody Maker, August 28, 1954, 19.

 

April/May?

Carroll Dickerson's Orchestra

Gail Brockman replaced by Paul King, Calvin Ladnier, Raymond Orr (tp); George Hunt, J. Taylor replaced by Jerry Valentine and Milburn Newman (tb); Nat James replaced by Johnny Houser, Charlie Parker (as); Tom Archia, Eddie Johnson (ts); Marl Young (p, arr); Clarence Hog Mason (b); Hillard Brown (d); Carroll Dickerson (dir).

Rhumboogie, Chicago, IL.

November 20, 1943–June 1944.

Parker probably joined sometime in April. He seems to have been fired at the latest just after June 1.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sadik Hakim (a.k.a. Argonne Thornton), “Reflections of an Era - My Experiences with Bird and Prez,” Jazz Journal, August 1996, 18: Parker got a job at the Rhumboogie.

 Ad in Chicago Defender, November 24, 1943, 12: Dickerson at the Rhumboogie.

Ad in Chicago Defender, May 27, 1944, 10: Dickerson at the Rhumboogie.

C. Walton: “New York And the Music revolution: Raymond Orr, trumpet.” www.jazzinchicago.org

Raymond Orr states that Parker was not in the band very long. “He had hoboed to Chicago and someone brought him to a Rhumboogie rehearsal.... Johnny Houser let him use his alto... (Hillard Brown played bass and Marl Young piano.”

C. Walton: “Marl Young.” www.jazzinchicago.org

Carroll Dickerson led the Rhumboogie band from November 20, 1943, until June 1, 1944, where Marl Young took over. At a Local 208 meeting in January 1944 concerning conflicts of leadership the band members were mentioned: Gail Brockman, Calvin Ladnier, Raymond Orr (tp); George Hunt, J. Taylor (tb); Nat Jones (as); Tom Archia, Eddie Johnson (ts); Marl Young (p & arr); Clarence "Hog" Mason (b), Hillard Brown (d), Carroll Dickerson (dir).

At a new Local 208 meeting at June 1, 1944 concerning conflicts of leadership the band members were mentioned: Paul King, Calvin Ladnier, Raymond Orr (tp): jerry Valentine, Milburn Newman (tb); Johnny Houser (as); Tom Archia, Eddie Johnson (ts); Marl Young (p & arr); Clarence "Hog" Mason (b); Hillard Brown (d); Carroll Dickerson (dir). A second alto was not present at the meeting. Marl Young's reminiscences to have Johnny Houser on lead alto instead of Nat Jones by the time Parker was in the band.

http://myweb.clemson.edu/~campber/rhumboogie.html

Marl Young immediately fired Charlie Parker and Tom Archia, when he became a leader of the band.

 

April/May?

Boyd Raeburn's and His Band

Hot Lips Page Band

Including Hot Lips Page (tp), Charlie Parker (as); Sadik Hakim (a.k.a. Argonne Thornton) (p).

Sherman Hotel, Chicago, IL.

 

Sadik Hakim (Argonne Thornton), “Reflections of an Era -My Experiences with Bird and Prez," Jazz Journal, August 1996, 18: “I did work a gig with Bird in Chicago. For a while we played at the Sherman Hotel with Hot Lips Page opposite Boyd Raeburn’s Big Band.”

I have not been able to verify such a gig.

 

April/May?

Jam Session

Charlie Parker, Art Tatum.

Chicago, IL.

 

Sadik Hakim (Argonne Thornton): “Reflections of an Era - My Experiences with Bird and Prez,” Jazz Journal, August 1996, 19: “I remember hearing Art Tatum with Bird in Chicago. After the gig in the Loop, Tatum would come down to a club on the South Side, drinking beer after beer and playing for five or six hours.”

I have not been able to verify Tatum in Chicago in this period.

 

May

Billy Eckstine Orchestra

There are very contradicting evidences of Parker’s entering in the Eckstine band.

The simplest story is Billy Eckstine’s: He tells that he went to Chicago in the spring of 1944 and brought Charlie Parker and other band members with him back to New York. 3 weeks of rehearsals started in May, and Parker was a member when the band started out in early June.

This can be supplemented with the testimony of Buddy Anderson, telling that Parker came to his home in New York and urged him to join the band for the opening engagement.

An account from Nobel Sissle is contradicting this version: Sissle tells that Parker joined his band in Chicago and traveled with it shortly, ending up at St. Louis, MO., where Parker joined the Eckstine band.

This can be supplemented with material, which indicates that Parker may have been in Chicago as late as June 1.

It is not easy to reconcile these pieces of information, but Parker may have gone with Eckstine to New York in May and quickly have returned to Chicago because there was no economic founding for the rehearsal period, or because he did not want to participate in the initial tour into the South.

 

B. Eckstine: “Leading My Own Outfit,” Melody Maker, August 28, 1954, 19.

P. Schaap (Bird Flight, WKCR) claims that Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie auditioned for a subbing job in the John Kirby band, at the Aquarium. Gillespie got the gig but not Parker.

F. Driggs, “The Story of Buddy Anderson,” Jazz Journal, February 1962, 12.

Noble Sissle in R. Reisner, Bird: The Legend of Charlie Parker (1962), 212-13: Sissle was in need of an alto player in Chicago and hired Charlie Parker. “Charlie didn’t stay with us long, maybe three or four weeks… When we hit St. Louis, Billy Eckstine’s new band, which had all the young bebop musicians, was playing in town, and Charlie left me to join him.” Sissle places this late 1943, clearly a mistake.

 “Noble Sissle’s Band at Pershing April 7,” Chicago Defender, March 1, 1944, 11.

Sissle came from a 14 months Hollywood engagement. It could hardly have been at that occasion that Parker should have joined him.

Sissle may have returned to the Chicago area later on, maybe after Canadian gigs. Parker could have joined Sissle in this period, going South with him and ending up at the Plantation in St. Louis just prior to the Eckstine engagement there.

“Advance Bookings,” Billboard, My 27, 1944, 15: Sissle at Queensway Ballroom, Toronto, Canada, on May 29.

Ads in Courier-Journal, May 31, 1944, 10 (opening June 1) and June 11, 1944, sec.2 10 (last day): Sissle at Club Madrid, Louisville, KY. June 1–11, 1944.

Ads in St. Louis Star and Post, June 15, 1944, 10 (opening) and July 6, 1944, 10 (Billy Eckstine coming Friday 7): Sissle at the Plantation, St. Louis. MO., June 15–July 6.

 

May mid

Billy Eckstine Orchestra

Billy Eckstine goes to Chicago in order to recruit band members. He contacts Jerry Valentine, Gail Brockman, Tommy Crump, and Shorty McConnell, and brings Parker with him to New York.

 

B. Eckstine: “Leading My Own Outfit,” Melody Maker, August 28, 1954. 19.

Eckstine had been working at the Yacht Club until April mid, where he changed to the Onyx Club.

“Eckstein Crosses 52nd Street,” Billboard, April 29, 1944, 15: New York April 22 –Eckstein moved from Yacht to Onyx because the Yacht’s managers did not accept Eckstein’s doubling at the Apollo.

Ad in New York Age, April 15, 1944, 10: Eckstine and Boyd Raeburn at the Apollo April 14–20.

Eckstine’s engagement at the Onyx was from April 14–May 10, so it is no plausible that he went to Chicago until after May 10.

“Goings on about Town: Onyx,” New Yorker, May 6, 1944, 4: Al Casey Trio and Billy Eckstine through May 10.

 

May mid?

Red Saunders

Club De Lisa, Chicago, IL.

Charlie Parker and Billy Eckstine are present at an after-hour show.

 

Sadik Hakim (Argonne Thornton): “Reflections of an Era - My Experiences with Bird and Prez,” Jazz Journal, August 1996, 18–19:

“At this time there was a great club on the South side, Club De Lisa. The leader of their 12-piece band was a great show drummer, Red Saunders ...On Saturday night and Sunday morning, everyone would go to the De Lisa… Bird would sit in with Red Saunders's Band, which included altoist Nat Jones… Also playing was a great tenor player from Texas, Tom Archia. Billy Eckstine was at the show; this was before he formed his first band.”

 

May mid

Billy Eckstine Orchestra

Nola's Studios, New York, NY.

Rehearsals.

 

B. Eckstine: “Leading My Own Outfit,” Melody Maker, August 28, 1954. 19: 3 weeks of rehearsals.

R. Russell, Bird Lives (1988). 157–58: Rehearsal starts at Nola's first week of May. The date is probably pure conjecture.

 

June 9

Billy Eckstine Orchestra

Dizzy Gillespie (tp, arr); Gail Brockman, Buddy Anderson, Shorty McConnell (tp); Jerry Valentine (tb, arr); Bennie Green replaced by George Morrison, Howard Scott (tb); Charlie Parker?, Robert Junior Williams (as); Thomas Crump?, Lucky Thompson (ts); Leo Parker (bar); John Malachi (p); Connie Wainwright (g); Tommy Potter (b); Billy Eckstine and others (d); Billy Eckstine (voc, dir).

Wilmington, DE.

June 9, 1944

 

Ad in Morning News (Wilmington, DE.), June 9, 1944, 28.

“Sands Ahead of Eckstine Ork,” Billboard, June 10, 1944, 20: Frank Sands Road manager. Tour opens June 9.

B. Eckstine, “Leading My Own Outfit.” Melody Maker, August 28, 1954, 19: Gives personnel. He Has Gene Ammons and Lucky Thompson from the start. Dizzy Gillespie missed the first date. He took a wrong train form Philadelphia, fell to sleep, and woke up in Washington.

R. Russell, Bird Lives (1988), 158: Benny Green was drafted shortly after the start.

 

June 11

Billy Eckstine Orchestra

Turner’s Arena, Washington, DC.

“Eckstine Band Set for Southern Tour,” Variety, May 24, 1944, 29:  Southern tour starting June 11 at Turner’s Arena.

“Music Grapevine,” Billboard, July 1, 1944, 15.

“Billy Eckstine 19G in 8 Dates,” Billboard, August 26, 1944, 18: Has had 4 weeks of one-nighters.

 

June 12

Billy Eckstine Orchestra

Mat Towels and Band

Cobb Foxhall Warehouse, Rocky Mount, NC.

27th Annual Colored June German (Dance)

 

Ad in News Journal and Guide (Norfolk, VA.), June 3, 1944, 11.

“Billy Eckstine 19G in 8 Dates,” Billboard, August 26, 1944, 18: Has had 4 weeks of one-nighters.

 

 

June 15

Billy Eckstine Orchestra

New Sunset Casino, Atlanta, GA.

8:30 p.m.–12:30 a.m.

 

“Billy Eckstine at Sunset Tonight,” Atlanta Daily World, June 15, 1944, 3.

June 21

Billy Eckstine Orchestra

Fort Lauderdale, FL.

 

“Advance Bookings,Billboard, June 17, 1944, 16.

June 22

Billy Eckstine Orchestra

Lakeland, FL.

 

“Advance Bookings,Billboard, June 17, 1944, 16.

June 23

Billy Eckstine Orchestra

Tampa, FL.

Joe ? (d) joins the band

“Advance Bookings,Billboard, June 17, 1944, 16.

B. Eckstine: “Leading My Own Outfit.” Melody Maker, August 28, 1954, 19: Picked up a drummer in Tampa called Joe. He dies later on in New Orleans.

“Teddy Edwards Interview” Cadence, April 1994, 11: Teddy Edwards gives details from this period.

 

June late

Billy Eckstine Orchestra

San Antonio, TX.

Charlie Rouse joins here instead of Crump.

 

“Billy Eckstine Brings His Own Band to San Antonio,” San Antonio Register, June 23, 1944, 6.

Charlie Rouse in I. Gitler, Swing to Bop (1985), 130-31: Charlie Rouse joins the band in San Antonia, Texas, replaces Tommy Crump who got drafted. He mentions that Lucky Thompson was in the band, what suggests that Gene Ammons had not yet entered the band.

 

July 1

Billy Eckstine Orchestra

Claudia’s Place, Dallas, TX.

 

Ad in Dallas Morning News, July 1, 1947, 3.

July 7

Billy Eckstine Orchestra

Dizzy Gillespie (tp & arr); Gail Brockman, Shorty McConnell, Buddy Anderson replaced by Miles Davis (tp); Jerry Valentine (tb, arr); Howard Scott, George Morrison (tb); Charlie Parker, Robert "Junior" Williams (as); Charlie Rouse? replaced by Gene Ammons, Lucky Thompson (ts); Leo Parker (bar); John Malachi (p, arr); Connie Wainwright (g); Tommy Potter (b); Art Blakey (d); Sarah Vaughan (voc); Billy Eckstine (voc, dir); Tadd Dameron (arr).

Peg-Leg Bates

Son and Sonny

Peck and Peck

Club Plantation, St. Louis, MO.

 July 7–17?

Art Blakey joins the band at the Plantation.

Tadd Dameron joins the tour arriving with new arrangements.

The engagement was moved to Club Riviera because of racial turmoil at the Plantation.

Miles Davis shows up at the Rivera opening, and he follows the band during the engagement. When Buddy Anderson gets sick he gets his chair for the rest of the engagement.

The band was living at the Booker Washington Hotel, where the band members rehearsed and jammed in the morning.

Parker’s first wife, Rebecca, visits Parker in St. Louis. It does not work out between them, so she returns quickly.

 

Ad in St. Louis Star and Times, July 7, 1944, 6: Club Plantation: opening tonight.

Ad in St. Louis Star and Times, July 13, 1944, 18: Club Plantation: Eckstine. Peg Leg Bates and others.

Ad in St. Louis Star and Times, July 14, 1944, 5: Club Plantation: Son & Sonny, Peg Leg Bates and Peck & Peck.

Ad in St. Louis Star and Times, July 18, 1944, 6: Club Plantation: Jeter-Pillar Orchestra and Peg Leg Bates.

Radio programs in the Edwardsville Intelligencer (IL.) show KWR (MBS) broadcasts with Eckstine’s Orchestra at 10:35–10:45 p.m. on July 7, 10, 14, and 17.

B. Eckstine: “Leading My Own Outfit,” Melody Maker, August 28, 1954, 19.

Art Blakey in R. Reisner, Bird: The Legend of Charlie Parker (1962), 51.

Billy Eckstine in I. Gitler, Swing to Bop (1987), 128.

Billy Eckstine in D. Gillespie and A. Fraser, To Be or Not... to Bop (1979), 191.

G. Carner, The Miles Davis Companion (1996), 2: Elwood C. Buchanan (letter to Rolling Stones March 2, 1983): Miles Davis meets Gillespie and Parker at the Riviera.

Addie Parker in R. Reisner, Bird: The Legend of Charlie Parker (1962) 163: Parker’s first wife, Rebecca, visits Parker in St. Louis.

A. Dixon, “Charlie Parker ‘He Was My First, I Was His first, It was all special,’” Pitch Weekly, (Kansas City, MO.), April 10 1996, ? Here quoted from C. Haddix, Bird -The Life and Music of Charlie Parker (2013), 69—70, and 171 note 25. Rebecca tells of the visit in St. Louis.

 

July 18?

Billy Eckstine Orchestra

Club Riviera, St. Louis, MO.

July 18?–August early.

The engagement was moved to Club Riviera because of racial turmoil at the Plantation.

Miles Davis showed up at the Rivera opening, and he followed the band during the engagement. When Buddy Anderson got sick he got his chair for the rest of the engagement.

 

Radio programs in the Edwardsville Intelligencer (IL.) show KWR (MBS) broadcasts with Eckstine’s Orchestra at 10:35–10:45 p.m. on July 19, 21, 24, 26, 28, August 4, and 11.

G. Carner, The Miles Davis Companion (1996), 2: Elwood C. Buchanan (letter to Rolling Stones March 2, 1983): Miles Davis meets Gillespie and Parker at the Riviera.

 

 

 

August early

Billy Eckstine Orchestra

Louisville, KY.

 

“Billy Eckstine 19G in 8 Dates,” Billboard, August 26, 1944, 18: Has had 4 weeks of one-nighters.

August early

Billy Eckstine Orchestra

Cincinnati, OH.

 

“Billy Eckstine Ork Hailed as New sensation,” Pittsburgh Courier, August 19, 1944, 13.

“Billy Eckstine 19G in 8 Dates,” Billboard, August 26, 1944, 18: Has had 4 weeks of one-nighters.

 

August early

Billy Eckstine Orchestra

Youngstown, OH.

 

“Billy Eckstine Ork Hailed as New sensation,” Pittsburgh Courier, August 19, 1944, 13.

“Billy Eckstine 19G in 8 Dates,” Billboard, August 26, 1944, 18: Has had 4 weeks of one-nighters.

 

August early

Billy Eckstine Orchestra

Cleveland, OH.

 

“Billy Eckstine Ork Hailed as New sensation,” Pittsburgh Courier, August 19, 1944, 13.

“Billy Eckstine 19G in 8 Dates,” Billboard, August 26, 1944, 18: Has had 4 weeks of one-nighters.

August early

Billy Eckstine Orchestra

Flint, MI.

 

“Billy Eckstine 19G in 8 Dates,” Billboard, August 26, 1944, 18: Has had 4 weeks of one-nighters.

August early

Billy Eckstine Orchestra

Dizzy Gillespie (tp, arr); Howard McGhee (tp, arr); Gail Brockman, Marion Boonie Hazel, Jerry Valentine (tb & arr); Arnett Sparrow, Rudy Morrison (tb); Charlie Parker, John Jackson (as); Lucky Thompson, Gene Ammons (ts); Leo Parker (bar); John Malachi (p); Connie Wainwright (g); Tommy Potter (b); Art Blakey (d), Sarah Vaughan (voc); Billy Eckstine (voc & dir).

Detroit, MI.

Marion Boonie Hazel has joined here replacing Buddy Anderson.

Howard McGhee subs for Shorty McConnell and is guest soloist.

John Jackson had replaced Junior Williams.

 

“Billy Eckstine Ork Hailed as New Sensation,” Pittsburgh Courier, August 19, 1944, 13: Gives the personnel.

“Billy Eckstine 19G in 8 Dates,” Billboard, August 26, 1944, 18: Has had 4 weeks of one-nighters.

A. Zimmerman, “Howard McGhee – Number One,” Jazz Journal, October 1987, 45: Howard McGhee was playing with Georgie Auld When Auld went into the South he left his black members, McGhee and Wilson behind on a leave. McGhee went back to his home in Detroit, whereupon Eckstine's band came through.  Short a trumpeter, Dizzy Gillespie got Howard into the band until Auld came back north and Howard and Shadow Wilson could rejoin.

 

August 18

Billy Eckstine Orchestra

Regal Theatre, Chicago, IL.

August 18-24, 1944.

 

Ad in Chicago Defender, August 19, 1944, 9.

“Eckstine Spots Strong Trumpets:” Down Beat, September 1, 1944, 13: gives the personnel.

J. Sippel, “Bands Dug by Beat: Billy Eckstine.” Down Beat, October 1, 1944, ?: “Driving force behind the reeds is Charlie Parker... After hearing this band doing six shows during the week at Regal your reviewer didn't hear repeats on many of the choruses Parker did…”

S. DeVeaux, Jazz in Transition - Coleman Hawkins and Howard McGhee, 1935-1945. Unpublished dissertation. Berkeley, University of California (1985) note 31, 215.

 

August late

Charlie Parker

 Parker seems to have left the Eckstine band after the Regal, Chicago, engagement.

He soon settled in New York in order to work out the quarantine in connection with a transfer to Local 802, the New York branch of AFM. This explains that we do not meet him in any formal live engagements in the rest of the year.

 

Phil Schaap (Bird Flight, WKCR): Parker left the Eckstine band after the Chicago gig.

F. R. Hayde, Stan Levey - Jazz Heavyweight (2016), Kindle ed. loc. 550: Stan Levey had a gig with Oscar Pettiford at the Tic Toc in Boston, just before Eckstine opened. He met the band but he does not mention Parker, which he met first time in New York a little later.

R. Russell, Bird Lives (1988), 164-67: Russell claims that Parker arrived in New York on Labor Day and at once got a job on 52nd Street. His account is mostly pure fiction.

 “G.I.’s Get Key to 802; Door Open to Vets,” Billboard, December 30, 1944, 9: The transfer rules of Local 802 implied 6 months’ waiting period, where a steady a job was forbidden the first 3 months and a waiting period of further 3 months came afterwards.

 

September early?

Jam Session

Charlie Parker (as); Thelonious Monk (p); Stan Levey (d).

Downbeat Club, New York, NY.

September 1944?

 

F. R. Hayde, Stan Levey - Jazz Heavyweight (2016), Kindle ed. loc. 719–745:  Stan Levey subbing with Thelonious Monk's band at the Downbeat Club, meets Charlie Parker for the first time when Parker pops up at a Monday night am session there.  He follows Parker home to his windowless room at the Marionette Hotel in Harlem. Here Parker introduces Levey to heroin.

 

September early

Tiny Grimes Trio

Clyde Hart (p); Tiny Grimes (g); Jimmy Butts, later replaced by Oscar Pettiford (b).

Erroll Garner (p)

Betty Green (p, voc)

Billy Daniels (voc)

Ann Cornell (voc)

Tondelayo’s, New York, NY.

September early–October.

Tondelayo’s mc.

Charlie Parker jams with Grimes here.

 

“Name Acts Star at Tondelayo’s,” Pittsburgh Courier, September 23, 1944, 13.

A. Shaw, 52nd Street: The Street of Jazz (1971), 328."

 

 

September 15

Tiny Grimes Quintette

Charlie Parker (as); Clyde Hart (p); Tiny Grimes (g, voc), Jimmy Butts (b); Harold Doc West (d).

WOR Studios, New York, NY.

Commercial recordings or Savoy Records

 

http://www.plosin.com/milesahead/BirdSessions.aspx?s=440915

 

October early

Jam session

Miles Davis, who had moved to New York, in order to attend the Julliard School, meets Parker at jam session at the Heatwave.

 

Miles Davis in R. Reisner, Bird: The Legend of Charlie Parker (1962), 79.

M. Davis and Q. Troupe, Miles (1989), 57–58.

J. Szwed, So What - the Life of Miles Davis (2002), 30–31.

 

October early

Charlie Parker/Miles Davis

Charlie Parker moves in at Miles Davis’ lodgings at 149th Street.

 

M. Davis and Q. Troupe, Miles (1989), 58.

Miles Davis in R. Reisner, Bird: The Legend Of Charlie Parker (1962), 79.

J. Szwed, So What - the Life of Miles Davis (2002), 33.

 

December

Charlie Parker/Miles Davis

When Miles Davis’s wife, Irene, arrives in New York the couple moved to a bigger apartment at 147th Street, between Broadway and Riverside Drive, owned by Bob Bell, a family relation. Bell also had a cocktail lounge, a restaurant, and a soda parlor called Bell's at this address.

Their upstairs neighbors were Lucky Thompson and Freddie Webster. Later on Parker moved in at the building, sharing a room with Stan Levey.

 

M. Davis and Q. Troupe, Miles (1989), 58.

J. Szwed: So What - the Life of Miles Davis (2002), 38–39: Based on interview with Irene Davis.

Chan Parker (Richardson), My Life in E-Flat (1993), 22-23.

F. R. Hayde, Stan Levey - Jazz Heavyweight (2016), Kindle ed. loc. 806: Rooming with Parker in Harlem. 

 

 

 

December 8

Billie Holiday

Billie Holiday (voc); Joe Springer (p).

Oscar Pettiford Band

Benny Harris (tp); Budd Johnson (ts); Clyde Hart (p); Oscar Pettiford (b); Stan Levey (d).

Tiny Grimes Quartet

Tiny Grimes (g); Joe Springer (p); Jimmy Butts (b); Eddie Nicholson (d).

Harry the Hipster Gibson

Spotlite Club, New York, NY.

December 8, 1944–January 1945.

Charlie Parker used to jam here.

 

 

Ad in New York Amsterdam News, December 9, 1944, 9B.

“Goings on about Town: Spotlite,” New Yorker, December 16, 1944, 4: Gibson, Tiny Grimes Quartet, Billie Holiday.

“Goings on about Town: Spotlite,” New Yorker, December 23, 4: Gibson, Charlie Shavers Band, Tiny Grimes Quartet, Billie Holiday. Same December 30.

“Goings on about Town: Spotlite,” New Yorker, January 6, 1945, 4: Tiny Grimes Trio, Billie Holiday.

“Goings on about Town: Spotlite,” New Yorker, January 13 1945, 4: Tiny Grimes Trio, Nat Jaffe Band.

Tiny Grimes in S. Dance, The World of Swing (1974, 364–65: Parker used to jam here.

December/January?

Charlie Parker Trio

Charlie Parker (as); Joe Albany (p); Stan Levey (d).

Spotlite Club, New York, NY.

Probably Monday night jam sessions.

December 1944/January 1945?

 

I. Gitler, Jazz Masters of the 40s (1884), 25:  "Parker soon was leading his own trio, with Joe Albany on piano and Stan Levey on drums. Albany says that they played Monday nights at the Famous Door and that Baby Lawrence used to come in and dance with them. Levey places the club as Spotlite."

F. R. Hayde, Stan Levey - Jazz Heavyweight (2016), Kindle ed. loc. 822: Stan Levey tells that Parker's first band was a trio of Parker, Levey, and Hank Jones with Joe Albany subbing. They jammed at Minton’s and on 52nd Street.

 

December 22

Billy Eckstine and His Orchestra

17 pieces. Probably: Dizzy Gillespie (tp, arr); Gail Brockman, Shorty McConnell, Marion Boonie Hazel (tp); Jerry Valentine, (tb, arr); Joe Taswell Baird, Howard Scott, Chippie Outcalt (tb); John Jackson, Bill Frazier (as); Gene Ammons, Dexter Gordon (ts): Leo Parker (bar); John Malachi (p, arr); Connie Wainwright (g); Tommy Potter (b); Art Blakey (d); Sarah Vaughan (voc); Billy Eckstine (voc, dir).

Boyd & Chapman

Sandra & Foster

Jim Wong Troupe (5)

Tip, Tap & Toe

Apollo Theatre. New York, NY.

December 22-28, 1944.

Charlie Parker surprisingly is mentioned as soloist in the Variety review. He is not mentioned in the New York Age publicity article.

 

Ad in New York Amsterdam News, December 24, 1944, 10.

Ad in New York Age, December 22, 1944, 10.

“Billy Eckstine and Orchestra to Appear at Apollo Theatre,” New York Age, December 22, 1944, 10.

"House Reviews: Apollo, N.Y.," Variety, December 27, 1944, 35: Mentions Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie as soloists. Sarah Vaughan did not show up.

F. Driggs & H. Levine, Black Beauty - White Heat (1996), 320: Photo from the Apollo stage, allegedly from this engagement. Gene Ammons is missing. Parker is not here.